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13's for 1300 Maverick-The Space Ghost

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    #16
    Space Ghost Coast to Coast!
    Turns out, far too much has been written about great men and not nearly enough about morons


    Originally posted by seedyrom
    my neighbours called the cops...... not because of the sound of me working in the garage was too loud, but because i taped a cardboard box to my back, covered my self in vaseline and pretended i was a snail on their lawn

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      #17
      So if I pay 1300$ to drop a 4x4 Maverick from a helicopter, and it takes less than 13 seconds to hit the ground, does that count?

      In other news, the carbie is torn down for cleaning and rebuilding, and I snapped off an old stuck idle screw. It'll be a few days before I fix that. It's fairly decent out tonight so I'll probably go back out and finish up the distributor-into-oil pump drive mods, and get that done.

      Ernie is supposed to be removing the damper, although today was a beautiful day out and nothing got done, and it's supposed to rain tomorrow. we'll see if I get it or not.

      Mount trigger wheel
      Mount crank trigger
      Fix oil-pump-drive thing
      rebuild carb
      mount carb to turbo.

      That's it on my end, until Ern comes up with 4 tires and the turbo-to-manifold pipe. After that's all done...gotta mount throttle and transmission kickdown cables, and go racing.

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        #18
        Yes, because we would all love to see that happen!

        good progress mate!
        Turns out, far too much has been written about great men and not nearly enough about morons


        Originally posted by seedyrom
        my neighbours called the cops...... not because of the sound of me working in the garage was too loud, but because i taped a cardboard box to my back, covered my self in vaseline and pretended i was a snail on their lawn

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          #19
          1970's six cylinder, unopened for almost 50 years, bolts on turbo with draw through carb from a equally as old and leaky car sounds incredibly dangerous and a recipe for fire, much calamity and pain.

          I like like, carry on.

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            #20
            Updates.

            We stripped down all the junk in the engine bay to check out how much room there would be for zorst and to get rid of the huge 50lb A/C compressor.

            Battery used to sit here. Also check out the massive lack of insulation on what passes for a battery cable in the 1970's.



            apparently the track wants us to put it back, something something structural integrity something...

            Turbo bolted up to the intake, we were trying to not remove the exhaust manifold-but that didn't last long.



            Turns out the exhaust manifold has sheared both the rear bolts off of #6 and we'll have to pull the manifold anyway.

            Heater hoses, AC lines, and that vacuum can all gotta go.



            Swapped over the black hood with bullet holes in the front. Also swapped off the straight fender to put on the car that has to look good, we'll put the black fender that matches the hood on this car after fixing the rust hole under the battery tray.



            Floors are mint, though





            By the time we're done, we're hoping this guy is working tech again at the local track.




            In other news, I broke the distributor drive gear today trying to remove it, so had to order one of those. Add 16$ to the total.
            Last edited by Xnke; 11-11-19, 08:17 AM.

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              #21
              ...And we're on a roll here. Just dropped a brake drum on the TIG pedal and smashed it. Gotta wait til I can get that fixed to keep moving forward on this one.

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                #22
                The hits just keep coming.

                Some work done on the floors, because apparently "Active Weight Reduction" is on the list of banned upgrades for race cars.



                Patches were cut from the roof of a 57 Chevy.



                A snip here, trim there, and we're ready to bash these in to fit, and weld them in place:



                Welding happened while I wasn't around, so photos when I get back to the makeshift tent tomorrow.

                In other news, we started to work on welding up the J-pipe to plumb in the zorst, and broke off some bolts. One was particularly aggravating, as it's the rearmost bolt on the head-and there is absolutely no getting at it with a drill or a stud wrench. So, the head came off. And that's when the bullshit started.

                Valve cover-had to bash this off with a big hammer. Was pretty much bonded on by some kind of ceramic-oil-cork hybrid. Pretty sure this is 1970 OEM factory installed engine oil.



                Under the cover, well...I've seen worse in BMW's so this can't be too shitty.



                And now the head is off. Better launch all those springs off and get rid of them, they won't live under boost. A quick trim of the valve guides and LS1 valve stem seals/spring seat combos will be fitted, and standard LS1 valve springs and retainers pulled from the original LS-powered Colorado project will get used.



                This, however, is a problem.



                That's the #2 cylinder exhaust. Well, 3/4 of it, anyway. Gonna need some valves...and a valve job. But no money for that. Gotta be creative.

                Plan A was run it anyway, but we decided not to.

                Plan B was to do a valve job, and cheat like a motherfucker.

                Plan C was to buy one valve and lap it in. But that still costs money.

                Plans D through V were equally distasteful.

                Plan W though...Plan W is to weld the missing section of valve back in, grind it back round, and stuff that bitch back in there.

                It's a plan. It's not a *great* plan, but it's definitely a plan.

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                  #23
                  Welding the valve failed miserably. Pretty sure that valve is actually made of sawdust, the thing just crumbled away when I started grinding. Meh.

                  New valves are 36$ shipped. Only issue is that the early 1.6" intake valves are not available that cheap, only the late run 1.75" valve...so I gotta figure out how to cut the valve seats for less than 217$. Because that's how much money we have left before 1300$ is gone.

                  The welder is still broken, but I have kludged it together fairly well until the new pedal arrives. Strapped a clicker onto the torch and re-taught myself 4T mode, I hate it. But it is working.

                  Intake manifold has been made. I don't really care what it looks like, or if it flows perfect. If it' needs adjusting later, I'll adjust it later-but for now, bask in the horror that is my lack of fucks:





                  The carb sets this way round so that all the jetting and adjustable bits are completely open to...adjustment. I can adjust main jets, power valve channel restrictors, power valve, idle screws, and if I'm a brave brave man, air correctors and emulsion tubes, without removing the carb from the engine.



                  Speaking of the carburetor, I'm using a 1967 Ford Autolite 2100, 1.23" venturis, which will flow about 356CFM stock. I've polished and halfed the throttle shafts, blended the venturi throats, and have collected a small assortment of booster blocks to work with (the booster block contains both boosters, the air bleeds, emulsion tubes, and pump jets) to get things dialed in. Swapping the booster block to one from a smaller carb means less booster signal but more airflow through the carb, so I can bump this thing up to a 520CFM carb at the expense of booster signal. To make this thing actually tunable as a draw-through, I need a way to enrich the mixture when under boost, but lean the mixture under vacuum. Enter the power valve.

                  Normally the power valve opens a second set of drilled holes to feed the main jet well, when manifold vacuum falls below 7.5inHg. That's pretty much the behavior I want, but I want it to do it under boost-so replacing the power valve with a Holley 2.5inHg valve, and modding the power valve channel restrictors and boost-referencing the power valve, will let it add an adjustable amount of fuel under the vacuum to boost transition. While under boost, the valve will continue to add fuel to the main jet well. Just having drilled holes is OK...but by drilling the stock PVCR passages out to fit a brass set screw, a small stock of interchangable jets can be made. I've drilled a pair to the 0.038" stock size, and a pair in each size from 0.040 to 0.060 by 0.002" increments. That should be enough. If not, well, they're a quarter a piece to make new ones. These little brass jets double as air bleeds too. In the photo below, you can see the two new jets in the PVCR well, and the setscrew blocking off the original vacuum drilling to the PV.



                  Before all that could happen though, I had to remove a broken screw out of the dang thing. When I was tearing the carb down for rebuild, I snapped off one of the idle adjust screws trying to remove the rusty thing. In order to save the casting, I employed a trick that only works for aluminum, brass, copper, or zinc: Alum in hot water. It takes a little time, but a combination of drilling the broken screw to the largest size that did not break through into the taper, and did not touch the threads in the aluminum body, I was able to speed it up. And it stinks bad. Don't do it in the house.

                  Busted off screw, and the prep setup for the soak:



                  Just a pitcher of water, a bag of potassium aluminum sulfate (alum) or ammonium aluminum sulfate (also called...alum) and a pan that can be anything but steel or iron (aluminum or glass is fine, disposable is best...)



                  To make it work faster I use a hot plate and just keep it slightly below boiling. Dissolve as much alum as you can get to dissolve in the hot water-and you'll have to add some later as it gets used up.



                  The steel screw, or broken tap, or snapped off EZ-out that has wronged you, will be dissolved into black sludge in a few hours. Every hour or so, scrape away whatever sludge has built up on the steel part, then back into the hot alum solution. It does turn some high-zinc carb bodies blackish, but it's just surface discoloration. I soda blasted mine back off later. You can see here, by running the tap into the hole a very fine thread of steel was all that was left after 12 hours in the hot alum bath-and this was a 10-32 screw an inch long to start with. (Roughly M5x0.8 20mm long)



                  That white stuff on the carb body is alum-so when you're done, a few washings and a soak in clean hot water will dissolve that off and clear out any drillings or passages that might have alum crystallizing in them. Still, go back and check them. The smaller ones can be clogged.

                  Now that the carb is fixed, the intake is made, and some valves are ordered, I gotta figure out how to get a 3" exhaust off the turbine without busting the windshield out. I only have an amazon special 3" V band and some scraps of 3" stainless left over from doing my 240Z exhaust, about 2 foot of straight pipe and 90* of a U-bend. The turbo has a 2.85" V-band, which is...not gonna happen. Even Ebay wants a LOT of money for them. A bit of stainless plate out of the scrap bin and a hole saw, and I'll get the thing piped I guess.

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                    #24
                    That trick with the alum I've never heard of. Brilliant!

                    As for the head, can you find a head in a wrecking yard and sell the old one for scrap?

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                      #25
                      Unlikely. Most of these engines got crushed/junked/scrapped because the cars were worthless, or they were in a mustang and the owner ripped them out to put in a V8. About the only vehicle they came in, that the owners still want them, is a Ford Bronco.

                      The head itself is fine, but it's gonna need new valves. The valves were cheap, it's the valve job that will cost us. I'm thinking of borrowing a set of stones and just grinding it in, it's not that super critical for this build.

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                        #26
                        Nice progress.

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                          #27
                          Cylinder head is at the shop. Dude-bro-chad is the hometown tractor pull expert in the not-even-one-horse town in backwater Kentucky that the car is currently residing in, and he's assured us it'll be the most badass 200 I6 he'll build this year. Says it reminds him of the last one he did in the 90's, which is good enough for us. He's even got the valve guide cutter we'll need to fit and use LS valve seals and springs so were' ahead a hundred bucks over the next closest machine shop.

                          In other news, Dude-bro-chad has asked us if we wanted to cam it and if we had a timing set...so we do now.

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                            #28
                            Nice

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