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1995 4runner RV6 - Norbie bought a fourby

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    #46
    Originally posted by bboy View Post
    I'm in the auto 4WD side. And anyone with a 4WD will have an opinion on this. Probably the second most debated topic after Toyota vs Nissan.

    For off road duties it's smoother, constant power delivery, and you can crawl just by using your right foot. Going on bumpy/rocky terrain in a manual, you start bouncing a bit, your right foot starts bouncing a bit, and because manual the car starts jerking a bit, eventually turns into rock hopping haha

    On sand, going through heavy stuff and having to put the clutch in to change gears (up or down), you lose all drive and therefore momentum. Mix that with a little inexperience and you're bogged.

    An advantage for manuals is hill descent control with engine braking. Auto you have to ride the brakes.

    Playing in the mud I don't think makes that much of a difference in auto or manual, because you usually ping it in one gear with all 4 wheels spinning.
    I agree 100%. Living in the middle east I do a lot of sand driving. The auto makes it a breeze. I'm sure 35" tyres, beadlocks, diff locks abd 500hp helps too, but the auto mskes light work of it all. I'm also very pro petrol 4wds now too. Australia is the only country obsessed with diesel 4wds. I see it makes sense in some instances like touring, but fucked if I'll ever be bothered with slow oil burning shitboxes again. You cannot resell diesel 4wds in the middle east abd you even have a hard time finding a place that will sell you diesel.
    Torque sells tow cars.
    Horsepower wins horse races.

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      #47
      these are super cool, amazing to see one without any obvious rust

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        #48
        I spent a bit of time working on this over the weekend - I mostly wanted to give it a thorough once over and work out what needs to be fixed or replaced before my camping trip in a few weeks. So I got it up on the hoist:



        I was a bit nervous about this because I'd never put anything this big on my hoist before, and never anything with a full chassis. I figured it out though and I wasn't crushed to death so that's a win.

        Overall it looks very clean underneath, not a spot of rust anywhere, and honestly no major red flags that I could see. The exhaust appears to be stock up to the muffler in front of the diff, then it's just a 2 1/4" pipe behind that, and it looks like there was a second muffler behind the diff from factory which has been removed. That would explain why it's a lot noisier than expected:



        The drivetrain looks mostly fine, and I checked the oil in the diffs and the transfer case, it all looked pretty new to my surprise, and there weren't even any visible leaks:



        I did find a few minor issues that need attention:
        - Rear tailshaft unis have a fair bit of slop, which would explain the driveline vibration I think. Not sure if these are the rebuildable type but I'll probably just take it into a driveline shop and get them to deal with it.
        - One of the front CV boots is torn. I've already got a replacement, just need to fit it.
        - Fuel filter looks like it hasn't been changed since 1995. Couldn't find a replacement locally so I'll probably have to get one online.
        - Suspension bushes look a bit average, although not as bad as expected. I think I'll leave it for now but the suspension will want a full overhaul at some point.
        - The bullbar was a "custom" job (previous owner said it was off a Landcruiser) and had been modified to fit, and the modifications were of a spectacularly poor quality. It was bolted to the front of car with two custom brackets which had been welded to the bullbar, and one of those welds had failed completely (almost no penetration) and the other was just barely holding on. That would explain why I could see the top of the bullbar wobbling around while I was driving! So that's been welded up properly and hopefully won't fall off now.

        I checked the brakes, the front rotors are well within spec and the pads have lots of meat on them, I think this was done pretty recently. The brakes are really big too, nice chunky 4-piston calipers on the front and giant drums on the rear. I also did an oil change, the oil was pretty black but what would you expect with nearly 400k on the clock. While doing that I noticed a sticker on the underside of the bonnet, it was from a local mechanical shop and it said the timing belt had been done about 20k ago. I guess this is what the hillbilly previous owner meant when he said the engine had just been rebuilt!

        Overall I'm pretty surprised at how good everything looks? There's really not a lot to do before it's ready to go on the beach IMO - apart from the above maintenance items I'm going to put a nice big external cooler on the transmission and a smaller one on the power steering. Then cross my fingers and send it!
        Norbie!

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          #49
          Originally posted by Norbie View Post
          - Suspension bushes look a bit average, although not as bad as expected. I think I'll leave it for now but the suspension will want a full overhaul at some point.
          Just stay away from the polyurethane bushings, they do not last when you actually use it for 4WDing.

          Could coat the underneath with Lanox or something similar before you go to the beach to give it some protection. Ensure you thoroughly clean everything after beach trips if you want to keep it rust free
          The Slowly IS300

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            #50
            Not as bad as I'd imagined. Only bushes that'd fuck out on these in the rear are the Panhard rod rubbers.

            Tailshaft should have serviceable unis, but it can be a shit of a job if some dumbarse has tried to do them before, and trashed the bores.
            Originally posted by brewdles
            In short, some cunt at test and tune had a 250cc honda turning to 11ty and it sounded porn. Do that.

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              #51
              Bullbar looks more like a later model Hilux bullbar, Land Cruiser would need alot of cutting and shutting to fit. Even when mounted properly you'll see movement as the chassis and body move independently to a point, I've got a TJM bar on my Mitsubishi Challenger and it's amusing how much it moves on rough roads.
              Looking at that rear bumper I'd have a look around the rear of the chassis/towbar area to make sure it's all good, rear bumper is off a Jap Surf which makes me wonder if this has had a smack up the arse. In saying that, the rear bumpers on these were just used to hide the chassis and offered zero protection, and tend to get ripped off when off roading anyway.
              Last edited by irsa76; 07-07-21, 09:34 AM. Reason: Derp, car has manual hubs

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                #52
                Thanks for the advice everyone, I'm in new territory here so all info is appreciated!

                I've found a local shop that can do the tailshaft for me, so I'm going to pop it out and let them deal with it. Doesn't cost much so might as well make it easy.

                The bullbar has definitely been hacked up a fair bit, who knows where it actually came from though, I certainly wouldn't trust anything the hillbilly previous owner said! I've noticed it does still move around a bit post welding but it's way less movement than I was seeing before. Actually attaching it to the chassis seems to help.

                Interesting about the rear bumper, I didn't know that. I'll have a closer look next time I'm under the car.
                Norbie!

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                  #53
                  Most importantly, have you bought those cool stickers yet?
                  Hide yo' wife!!!

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                    #54
                    From the one pic of the front bar it is almost definitely a ARB one from the IFS Hilux (1997-2005), which just required new mounting brackets to fit, as you have found out. Same as the one on my Hilux

                    The rear bar is the Jap surf one, but check on the car whether it is bolted to the towbar or to the chassis. It looks like they have put a 2WD Hilux towbar on the thing which came with optional rear bar mounts that you were supposed to put the chrome rear bar onto. The Jap Surf bars fit those same bar mounts perfectly.
                    Chris
                    ------
                    The MX5 Noujet (its up market) | The Hilux Complete Nugget
                    I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself. - D.H.Lawrence

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                      #55
                      Going to go slightly against the grain ideal tow pig imo would be close ratio manual...

                      4wding stuff a well behaving auto for sure.

                      In saying that we have an 8speed auto in the v6 amarok as a tow rig /main car.

                      4wd is a little unerving as no engine braking in 1st gear and uses hill decent control it works but is too fast imo on rocky type terrain

                      Towing is tremendous in this thing being our van is 3t and bobcat on the plant trailer is 3.5t plus a bit...

                      In both cases I usually use tiptronic and lock into gear as it wants to shift too much for my liking


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                        #56
                        Considering I don't have anything to tow I haven't really been thinking about towing performance. As for 4WDing it will likely only see beach and dirt tracks, I can't see myself doing anything too hardcore. But then again you never know, I might get hooked, sell all my cars and buy a 300 series!
                        Norbie!

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                          #57
                          i have driven a bunch of automatic toyotas FWD, RWD and 4WD and not 1 had an issue with engine braking in all gears

                          i have only ever experienced this once with a VL commodore why is it assumed auto == no engine braking?

                          www.holditflat.com

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                            #58
                            My 100 series landcruiser has engine braking in all gears, but is also a fat fucker, and on steeper descents it picks up speed more than one would like. Mates with manual 80/100 cruiser do not have this problem? The old slushbox torque converter allows for some slip which is generally a positive in most situations.

                            Originally posted by Norbie View Post
                            Considering I don't have anything to tow I haven't really been thinking about towing performance. As for 4WDing it will likely only see beach and dirt tracks, I can't see myself doing anything too hardcore. But then again you never know, I might get hooked, sell all my cars and buy a 300 series!
                            Bit harder bush/dirt/mud is good fun with the right people!
                            The Slowly IS300

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                              #59
                              So, this is car #7, right?

                              | 1963 RK43 Toyota Lite-Stout (Stanley) | 2002 EC5W Mitsubishi Legnum VR-4 Type-S (Larry) |

                              Originally posted by Old Major
                              Perhaps she feels inadequate when you cum in other guys?

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                                #60
                                Originally posted by schnitzelburger View Post

                                i have only ever experienced this once with a VL commodore why is it assumed auto == no engine braking?
                                It isn't no engine braking, it is less engine braking when compared with the same vehicle specced with a manual gearbox.

                                Particularly older 4wds, if they were auto they ran taller first gear / transfer case / diff ratio (or a combination of all three). This was because they generally had fewer ratios (3 or 4 speed auto vs 4 or 5 speed manual) and the torque converter would allow it to pull a taller first gear from standstill.

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