Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Open Wheeler Toy

Collapse
X
Collapse
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Roy928tt
    replied
    Hmm, all slow in the shed this week, my current mission is to secure a set of main bearings in .010" undersize, Chris prefers not to grind till he has bearings in his hand.

    I've also been scoping around for nuts, I picked up CAT washers last week, but I'm still looking around for 3/8 unf head and main nuts, ARP make suitable nuts but they don't sell direct and onsellers are adding serious percentages. I've had a look at buying Mini cylinder head nuts, they work plenty fine on Minis, I can't see an issue, and they are more affordable, somewhat fitting also, both are children of the 60's.

    The actual fitting of the cylinder head is a precision operation, there is of course no head gasket, 'O' rings seal the coolant and oil passages and a bronze fire ring seals the cylinder. These rings are supposed to stand .002 " proud of the cylinder block with a tolerance of .0005" ( that is .5 thou). The 10 studs (3/8 ") clamp and seal those, while a row of 5/16 studs are screwed into the head and these have nuts in the valley and outside of the block (you can see the bosses on the outside of the block in the picture above) , but before they are tightened there must be shims fitted between the block and head, all being equal, a .002 shim. Shims are fitted around these studs and at the ends of the cylinder head.





    Leave a comment:


  • Roy928tt
    replied
    Originally posted by garvice View Post
    Very cool to hear engineering feats like that, especially when it's by Aussies who are just working away unnoticed in the background.
    Yes, it's amazing what has been done over the years, I believe Adrian has the casting moulds for a 1.5 litre V6 F1 engine that was designed and built in Adelaide in the early '60's ! As I understand there was one built and run.......the Clisby V6 engine, LOL I just googled the Clisby V6 to confirm that, and there was a post from a certain Mike Bennett......

    But yes, I mean we used to have racecar manufacturers in Australia, now the chassis for S5000 comes from France....

    Strange day out at the motorkhana, Craig had a dental issue and didn't turn up, David was compelled to work this weekend after having 3 days at the hillclimb last weekend, this left Karien as sole driver of the Manta, It ran faultlessly all day and she revelled in the power steering. She probably ran slowest of the 3 specials competing but was joyed to be driving her special and it being useable and reliable. I'll take that.

    Leave a comment:


  • garvice
    replied
    Very cool to hear engineering feats like that, especially when it's by Aussies who are just working away unnoticed in the background.

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy928tt
    replied
    Yes, I caught up with Adrian to pay him on Friday. Last time I was there he showed me a photo of a pile of gearbox parts he had made for a Lotus 12........

    It wasn't until some time later that the pennies began to drop..... The Lotus 12 had a thing called the "Queerbox", it was a classic piece of Chapman thought, it fitted a 5 speed +reverse into an unfeasible space attached to a differential. It achieved this through an innovative sequential gear change mechanism that involved the dogs being on the internal bearing face of the input gears, anyway. It was hopelessly unreliable. Prior to establishing Cosworth, Keith Duckworth had worked for Lotus and had been tasked with fixing the "Queerbox",he didn't, he quit and set up Cosworth. Thus the "Queerbox" unreliable and unloved withered on the vine, forever known as a failure.

    In the last few years I'd heard that the Queerbox had been fixed, I'm sure this information came out of England.

    So I asked Adrian about the Queerbox, and his part in it's correction.

    It turns out, there is a guy, Mike Bennett in Adelaide who has a Queerbox in his Lotus, He and Adrian had combined their intellect and come up with what was required to make a Queerbox work, having achieved this, the global Lotus family soon discovered, and the photo of gearbox parts Adrian had shown me were for legendary Lotus mechanic Bob Dance, who also owns a Lotus with a Queerbox.

    I find this all rather headspinning, I deliver Duckworths' triumph to a local machinist and he turns out to have fixed something Duckworth had given up on.....Unfuckingbelievable!

    The other theme of the week has been C.A.M.S. remember them, Cunts Against Motor Sport, oh, of course they are now called Motorsport Australia, I spoke with a couple of people well connected this week, what a clusterfuck! I've always been of the opinion that rebranding exercises are a symptom not a cure and it would seem I'd be correct. Anyway, not my concern, as long as hillclimbs continue at Collingrove, no fucks given.

    So, off to Mallala tomorrow for a Motorkhana...trusting that all will go well.

    Oh, and on the Queerbox, Honda developed a gearbox for their stillborn 2009 car that used an internal selector system, so the idea was clearly seen to have an advantage by them.


    Leave a comment:


  • doctor ed
    replied
    impressed you got the main caps turned around that quickly. i remember last time i had stuff like that done it always got filtered to the very bottom of the priority list, and took many phone calls and pestering before anything happened. nice! horizontal dowel are a cool thing. never seen that before. makes serviceability a bitch, but the principle behind them is very cool!

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy928tt
    replied
    I couldn't be arsed getting out of bed this morning, then when I did finally get moving I got down to the shed and realised that I needed to fix the washing machine..... bloody thing had ground to a stop a couple of days ago with a terrible noise of a failing bearing. I couldn't turn the drum so presumed it was a bearing on the drum shaft, I pulled the carrier for that off before realising there was no issue with either bearing! It was the front bearing in the electric motor that had failed. So I convinced that to come apart, oxy and air chisel were used. I managed to find the appropriate 6202 bearing in the console of the truck and in no time it was making overalls clean again with a distinct lack of noise.

    Having sorted that I still hadn't found any enthusiasm for paying work, so I continued fitting Barina EPAS to the motorkhana special, in typical fashion, competition car preparation time expanded to fill all of the time that can possibly be allocated to it. Still, at the end of the day I could fire it up and check out the steering ( given that it is still up on stands off the floor, really can't tell how well it works yet)

    I did find myself leaning on the bench looking at the Cosworth pondering, pondering, just how much work and money is going to have to go into it to get it running. I've already decided it is the most stupid thing I've ever done. Which is both a blessing and a curse.

    Still, tomorrow the plan is to go on another buying mission, more bearings, bolts and "O" rings for it, and drop a spare head off to Adrian to get him to make some locating rings for the head to cam carrier studs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy928tt
    replied
    Originally posted by Faux Forg View Post

    You'd just have to re-size the dowel pin bores, no?
    Yes, you are right, still not as easy as not doing it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Faux Forg
    replied
    Originally posted by Roy928tt View Post
    ...So you can't take a quick lick off the bottom and tunnel bore them!
    You'd just have to re-size the dowel pin bores, no?

    Leave a comment:


  • oldracer
    replied
    very impressive bit of metal Roy

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy928tt
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMGP1108 (2).JPG
Views:	215
Size:	943.9 KB
ID:	7177826

    The picture that was supposed to be in the previous post. New main bearing caps, featuring the Duckworth longitudinal dowel pins. So you can't take a quick lick off the bottom and tunnel bore them!

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy928tt
    replied
    So the results came out, and David was 5th in a field of 86, I'm impressed with his consistency, 13 runs covered by 1.06 seconds, and both the Avons and Hoosiers used.


    This is back in my shed....

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMGP1108.JPG
Views:	5
Size:	1.38 MB
ID:	7177497

    So I'm looking at it, and there are a series of bolt holes inside the block between the bottoms of the liners, what's going on here? Then it dawns on me, there should be oil squirter jets bolted on there, ah fuck! more bloody bits I'm missing, I went back to thinking perhaps I should buy the other block I found in Australia.....then decided, fuck it, just delete them, for Collingrove it's not going to be an issue.

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy928tt
    replied
    S.A. 2020 hillclimb championship over. Car safely tucked away in shed, unbroken. That's nice.

    I haven't seen the results, but I'm expecting he came 5th in a field of about 65, behind a handfull of faster cars and in front of quite some, more expensive cars.

    After the amount of work done after the previous 2 hillclimbs I'm mighty relieved that I don't have to be fixing anything.

    Back to back testing of the $1680 Avons Vs. the $620 Hoosiers is absolutely inconclusive, there is no difference to be determined between them. Thus the Hoosiers win on budget.

    David has no requests, there is no aspect of the car he feels is letting the package down or needs attention. A sensible person would at this point leave the driveline and chassis as is and start to work on aero/wing development and see where that takes us, instead I'm embarking down the Cosworth path....

    Speaking of which, I got a call on saturday afternoon, "your job is finished" we have a couple of new main caps for the DFX $800.....wonderfull.

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy928tt
    replied
    Day two of the S.A. hillclimb championship, smooth sailing, no hiccups.

    For whatever reason, David hasn't managed to threaten his Personal Best, but he has been consistent and quick none the less. Whilst he was a little down at his apparent lack of speed, a quick look at the results sheets showed he was ranking no lower than 5th and most often 2nd, for a couple of clowns with a shed built car we couldn't complain. The faster guy has a Hayabusa powered F3 carbon chassis......

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy928tt
    replied
    We had the practice day for the South Australian Hillclimb Championships today and my preparation was shown to be lacking, quite lacking.

    Proper Prior Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance.

    Nothing showstopping, but enough to cost us time and confidence.

    I can only hope that everything that is going to be an issue has already caused us issue. It should be a lesson to me that everything must be right, not just near enough. If it was easy everyone would do it.

    Let's hope tomorrow goes smooth and fast.

    Leave a comment:


  • Roy928tt
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMGP1103.JPG
Views:	162
Size:	1.25 MB
ID:	7175722

    That is the scavenge pump unit. It incorporates a gerotor pump (at the right hand side) that transfers the drain oil from the turbo into the deaeration system. The centre section consists of two roots type pumps that suck the air /oil from the windage scavenged sump and transfer it to the centrifugal deaeration section. The oil is flung to the extremity of this section and finds it's way back to the dry sump tank in the bell housing, while the air is left in the centre where it vents to the oil filler on top of the bell housing and onward to the atmosphere. Click image for larger version

Name:	IMGP1071.JPG
Views:	161
Size:	1.73 MB
ID:	7175723 In this picture we can see the black oil filler on top of the dry sump tank/bell housing, the larger hose on the far side should be the air return from the scavenge pump, just behind the yellow ratchet strap is the fitting for the suction pump and on the other side in the same position is the fitting for the return oil from the scavenge pump.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X