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Clean and green: VE Ute

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  • Captain_Slow
    replied
    Looking behind it, I think you’re right about the decomposed foam. I think I’ll just have a shot at it anyway, I don’t imagine VE cloth door trims are expensive or hard to find if I stuff it up.

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  • Aaron
    replied
    I have the same problem in the XR4.

    You may find the panel the cloth/material is over is welded onto the actual door trims which makes removal a “cut molten tabs off” then plastic weld back on.

    In theory using a good spray upholstery contact glue, remove material and wipe/clean surfaces, spray contact adhesive on both and allow to set to the sticky point, bring the two things together from the middle out.

    In reality there’s probably a thin layer of foam that’s decomposed that needs to be replaced at the same time. It probably worth either getting a replacement new/used trim or taking the car to a trimmer and having a pro do it (and maybe use a different material if you and inclined).

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  • Captain_Slow
    replied
    Interesting photo effect there - door trim cloth is not in fact psychedelic greyscale lol

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  • Captain_Slow
    replied
    How do you reckon I’d reglue this? Was thinking some sort of spray glue given I can get in behind it? Driver’s side is similar but not as bad.

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  • BigJonWB
    replied
    Originally posted by Captain_Slow View Post
    . Given they’re alloy, RWD config out of the box, and have a readily available manual, why aren’t they more popular in conversions?
    I guess a couple of reasons.
    They are physically quite big, so possibly wouldn't fit in a lot of smaller cars.
    They also don't have a great reputation for reliability, timing chains are a well known and expensive issue, the thermostat is in a ridiculous spot, things like that.

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  • buzz
    replied
    Noice.

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  • Captain_Slow
    replied
    Looks good tinted, I reckon:

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  • PXL265
    replied
    [QUOTE=Captain_Slow;n7191907

    It also turns out you don’t know how much you need a ute until you have a ute, and then you don’t know how you ever lived without one.[/QUOTE]

    ​​​​​​Pretty much the reason why aside from about 5 years there has always been a ute in my garage for the last 25 years or so.....

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  • Captain_Slow
    replied
    Last piece of the badge puzzle, finally;



    No more being mistaken for one of the poors with their inferior port injection for me.

    TBH it’s a better engine than I expected. Bags of low end torque, revs pretty well, perhaps not the greatest top end ever but still pretty good. Given they’re alloy, RWD config out of the box, and have a readily available manual, why aren’t they more popular in conversions?

    It also turns out you don’t know how much you need a ute until you have a ute, and then you don’t know how you ever lived without one.

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  • buzz
    replied
    Am late to this party. Looks good. I coveted a HSV ute but when I bought my last car/ first new car I still had children living at home and didn't expect to be empty-nesting in a couple of months.
    If I see a Southern Cross sticker, or a "F*ck Off We're Full" sticker I'll grab you one.

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  • HSV Senator
    replied
    I actually have a spare one of those VE V8 boots, brand new. I just took the knob. Unfortunately, the well known shop fitting it for me managed to crack the new knob Need to swap that out.

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  • Captain_Slow
    replied
    Next little improvement. This shifter boot has bothered me since day one; “high disgust sensitivity” is apparently the term for what I have. It was falling apart and the stitching had turned brown. So it needed replacement.



    I bought a trim removal kit from eBay mostly for this job, and to be honest I’m not sure what half the stuff is for. But it has lots of tools for getting things off without damaging them.



    This is a pretty straightforward job. Lever up the trim piece, unplug the switches on it and get it out of the way, unscrew the surround, pull up really hard on the knob itself to get it off the shifter.







    The knob can be pretty hard to get off, but I got there in the end. You’ve just got to pull on it with a good, firm grip.

    Someone has obviously had that trim piece off before - some of the plastic clips were missing, and I lost another one. We’ll see if it matters. I might try and get some more.

    Turns out I inadvertently upgraded the part, comparing parts labels:



    The new one doesn’t look or feel like leather, but there you go. It was the only replacement part I could find, so I was surprised to see different versions. Sorry to anyone restoring a VE SSV in twenty years who needs a NOS shift boot in leather...

    Anyway, the knob comes off by turning the whole thing inside out and cutting off the cable tie. Then you just transfer the knob to the new boot, tuck it in, and cable tie it on. Sadly for future generations I replaced the factory black cable tie with this white one, ruining the originality...



    I used a couple of cable ties getting the tuck and alignment right. Sadly I neglected to check something a bit more fundamental...



    Oops.

    Anyway, it all went back together really easily, everything still works, and now it looks much better!



    I would have liked to replace the worn knob as well, but I didn’t think it was worth $150 on top of the $70 boot to buy another plastic one, and as far as I could work out the leather ones only came with the V8 shift pattern. But it doesn’t look as bad with the new boot under it anyway. Happy with that!

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  • gtrboyy
    replied
    E10 swill most likely...do know with a getz on 98 it made a big difference on.

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  • Captain_Slow
    replied
    I had to go to Sydney and back over the weekend and because it was just me, I decided to drive this. To my surprise, its fuel consumption came back at 9.4l/100km Canberra to Sydney and back on E10 with just me on board, which is pretty much the same as what I get in the VF2 Redline on 98 with four aboard on the same trip.

    Not what I would have guessed. It's thirstier than I'd expected around town as well. Poorer aerodynamics + gearing + E10 + higher mileage? This was sitting at about 2200-2300rpm in 110 zones, whereas IIRC the Redline sits at more like 1500.
    Last edited by Captain_Slow; 08-09-20, 11:58 AM.

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  • Aaron
    replied
    I’m no painter but I have seen the “black” touch ups before when a dark base metallic is touched up with a exact match to the code. What happens is the metallic flakes and sparkly goodness sink to the bottom when brushed or blobbed on and the dark paint base dries over the top as a darker or blackish version of the body colour. Some touch up paints are mixed specifically to cope with the blob/brush application rather than spraying.

    There are ways to minimise the effect when doing touch ups, including variations of the toothpick method. They all rely upon getting as little paint liquid as possible into the chip and as much of the metallic standing up and visible. Clear is then used to get the surface levelling.

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