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What recovery gear do you carry?

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    #31
    Originally posted by MartyHusseinXF View Post
    One of the better ways to avoiding needing to take so much stuff is to not take so much stuff, more weight, more recoveries, more breaking stuff.

    Anyone even seen a 76/79/200 series Toyota that wasn't over GVM?
    My work 79 weighs 3900kg without driver or passenger. Gvm is 3300

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      #32
      Originally posted by Shep View Post
      My work 79 weighs 3900kg without driver or passenger. Gvm is 3300
      This is pretty much my experience, gets painful pretty quick trying to recover the lumps or drag them up hills etc.
      Parramatta Eels, 2009 Premiership rightful winners.

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        #33
        In the Ute all the time
        Snatch strap
        Gloves
        Shackle
        Rear hitch
        Staun deflators 18psi
        Tyre pressure gauge
        Fire extinguisher
        200pce first aid kit

        For beach trips and other stuff
        Maxx tracks x2
        Small shovel
        Compressor
        2017 Ford Ranger XLT (Jeep Wrangler recovery vehicle)
        2007 KTM 250 SX

        Originally posted by Monza
        I've never considered myself the type of guy to eat arse but I am currently reviewing that policy

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          #34
          I mostly do desert driving being in the UAE.
          In the back of my raptor i carry a snatch strap, 2 soft shackles, an ARB hand which kit, gloves, a shovel, max trax, arb tyre gauge/vavle remover and two air compressors.


          Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
          Torque sells tow cars.
          Horsepower wins horse races.

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            #35
            The most important thing to a recovery I've found is knowing when you are about to need one and avoiding it. I mainly drive sand and it's usually at a point where you havnt taken enough momentum and start to bog down. I'm yet to see sand that I couldn't just stop and reverse in then attack with more speed. Sometimes you have to go back then forward ten times to get up something powdery just advancing a meter or two forward each time. If all else fails drop the pressure down to 12, I'm yet to need lower.

            Only time I've ever been bogged was half arsing it over a crest in the wrong gear. Bottom out, stuck. Shovel out twice. Very embarrassing. Now I only take my recovery gear to help others really.

            I carry a 5m snatch, 3 shackles & a tree trunk protector (for recovering shit heaps with no recovery points.

            Without sounding like an uppity cunt I just don't get stuck. I pick my lines and know what my ranger is capable of. I don't drive through puddles if I don't have to and have no problem taking the easy line to reduce stress on the vehicle. Breaking shit in mud gets tyresome very quickly.
            Originally posted by FatBoy
            Trump v Clinton is like cheering for the clap or genital warts. Either way it's gonna be ugly....

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              #36
              I use my recovery gear to help pull other people out of the sand mostly.

              Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
              Torque sells tow cars.
              Horsepower wins horse races.

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                #37
                Yeah same. First and only time I've been properly bogged was my first trip into a muddy area and I had nothing. Luckily a kind soul helped me out so I try to help out most people.

                Sometime it gets a bit tyresome as there are alot of clowns out there.
                Originally posted by FatBoy
                Trump v Clinton is like cheering for the clap or genital warts. Either way it's gonna be ugly....

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                  #38
                  Wasn't in a hilux in the glasshouse with your kids in the car perchance?
                  Don't worry, thats just the self-preservation instinct, in my experience you can safely ignore it.

                  Comment


                    #39
                    Originally posted by ahabthearab View Post
                    Some of you cunts get carried away.
                    I live in the bush and pretty much 4wd 3-4 times a week in tough country because it's my job.

                    GQ Patrol ute

                    I carry one chain
                    one snatch strap
                    a compressor
                    and a sthil chainsaw, The smallest one you can get.

                    No rocksliders
                    no lift kits
                    no winch
                    no other city related shit that 'whatever action 4WD store say you need to be a man'.
                    No super wanker mudder tyres

                    Essentially I tend to choose tracks and conditions on suitability and decide not to fuck bush tracks like every other fucker that treats 4wding like 4wheel motocross events
                    I agree with that as a whole, I think that people are too quick to through money at the problem and think that big lift, big tyres and twin locked will go anywhere and yet they end up creating a vehicle that cant put power down. I've seen many a 'boring' vehicle drive further than a heavily modified one, partially because one can get power to the ground and partially because some blokes are more skilled / experienced behind the wheel, and grr, don't get be started on Superflex or these even worse Hyper flex arms. But its these big rigs that seem to draw the attention and make people want to copy them. Can anyone remember a certain group of patrols on youtube with massive lifts and 40 inch sticky treps? I know rigs that are smaller lifted and tyred drive right past them, same tracks, same day but lets not make this into a wank fest.

                    That said, I think that as a whole lockers reduce track damage, especially on wet or loose conditions. I also think that a winch is, in more situations a easier and safer recovery at the expense of taking longer. I personally choose mud tyres for the extra strength they offer over most all terrains tyres, although a couple brands are starting to bridge the gap with the aggressive all terrains which will probably be my next tyre choice (Toyo RT)

                    Lastly, not at all having a at you, but I have spoken to many blokes who drive offroad very regularly and think they don't need a, b and c (normally in 70 something series). I invite them out, just some mild driving down a fire trail to get to a camp site, they look at me and think im nuts for attempting what needs to be attempted and im hardly the type that goes looking for hard shit to drive anymore (for that I have the bike). Everyone thinks they can go everywhere until the day they actually need to get somewhere.

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                      #40
                      I carry the basics already mentioned, plus a bottle jack with a home made jack plate.

                      Hi-lift jacks would have to be the most purchased but least used/least used correctly piece of recovery equipment. Really good in a few (rarely encountered for a lot of people) situations if your vehicle has jacking points, which most don't these days.

                      Not overloading your vehicle is the best "mod" you can do. Less chance of getting bogged, safer, and cheaper (don't buy shit you don't need).

                      Comment


                        #41
                        Originally posted by ar3nbe View Post
                        I agree with that as a whole, I think that people are too quick to through money at the problem and think that big lift, big tyres and twin locked will go anywhere and yet they end up creating a vehicle that cant put power down. I've seen many a 'boring' vehicle drive further than a heavily modified one, partially because one can get power to the ground and partially because some blokes are more skilled / experienced behind the wheel, and grr, don't get be started on Superflex or these even worse Hyper flex arms. But its these big rigs that seem to draw the attention and make people want to copy them. Can anyone remember a certain group of patrols on youtube with massive lifts and 40 inch sticky treps? I know rigs that are smaller lifted and tyred drive right past them, same tracks, same day but lets not make this into a wank fest.

                        That said, I think that as a whole lockers reduce track damage, especially on wet or loose conditions. I also think that a winch is, in more situations a easier and safer recovery at the expense of taking longer. I personally choose mud tyres for the extra strength they offer over most all terrains tyres, although a couple brands are starting to bridge the gap with the aggressive all terrains which will probably be my next tyre choice (Toyo RT)

                        Lastly, not at all having a at you, but I have spoken to many blokes who drive offroad very regularly and think they don't need a, b and c (normally in 70 something series). I invite them out, just some mild driving down a fire trail to get to a camp site, they look at me and think im nuts for attempting what needs to be attempted and im hardly the type that goes looking for hard shit to drive anymore (for that I have the bike). Everyone thinks they can go everywhere until the day they actually need to get somewhere.
                        Haha last video I watched of there's, the petrol Hilux that barely ran on a slope got up one of the hills easier than the 40in trep patrols.

                        Much prefer LROR, old mates Isuzu 110 idles up everything, if he revs it you know it's a serious climb.

                        Do agree the difference between looking like a seasoned pro and a hack is lockers, lsd, or really good traction control.

                        Sent from my VS Commodore eurovox headunit using Tapatalk
                        Tow car/camping bus: 2011 D40 Navara ST

                        Baby mobile: 2016 Nissan Qashqai

                        75 Mini Clubman club racer - DCOE powah

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                          #42
                          For sand:

                          Snatch strap, 4 x maxtrax, shovel, jack plate and tyre deflator!

                          For hi-country:

                          as well as the sand gear, Winch (Warn 9.5xp-s), 2 x 5m tree trunk protectors, 2 x snatch blocks, 20m extension rope, soft shackles, drag chain 9m 8mm, hi-lift and ork.

                          Lockers!
                          Originally posted by RotaUte
                          I take it you're a PF member by the gay sarcastic comment that I'm sure you thought
                          was funny after 2 beers, but it was lamer than possibly recordable.

                          Comment


                            #43
                            What recovery gear do you carry?

                            Originally posted by mondo2000 View Post
                            .

                            Not overloading your vehicle is the best "mod" you can do. Less chance of getting bogged, safer, and cheaper (don't buy shit you don't need).
                            This x10

                            I run:
                            Snatch, soft shackles, small shovel, hand winch, tire repair kit, spare valves, valve removal tool, quick deflate gauge and compressor.

                            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                            Originally posted by Babalouie
                            Geez we're a bunch of softcocks...we have a 911 and we're obsessing over non-functional ducts and indicator colours

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                              #44
                              Snatch strap and a couple of shackles, shovel, jack plate (chopping board as well) and a compressor. In the compressor box is some tyre plugs and a deflator.

                              For the places I go thatís plenty, if I was playing on muddy mountain tracks I might need a bit more

                              Iíve got a 12000lb winch in the shed but never seen the need to bolt it on, heavy Fucking thing...

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                                #45
                                I leave recovery gear in my cars, I mostly solo wheel where there are no roads or tracks either chasing gold or fires in the NT.

                                Wrangler. 1 spare tyre, plug kit and compressor, 12000lb winch, 2x20m winch extension straps,
                                long handle shovel and a small but comprehensive tool kit, tait UHF and VHF radios.

                                Work cruiser. 2 spare tyres, plug kit and compressor, 30L drinking water, high lift jack, 13500lb winch, 2x snatch straps
                                2x winch extensions, 9m drag chain, 1xdigital UHF, 2XVHF, 1XHF, 1x 80ch UHF radios, sat phone, spare filter kit, OBD2 scan
                                tool, 1/2 good tool kit, axe, long handle shovel, fridge and at least 4 days extra tucker, epirb. iPad with advenza PDF maps loaded
                                with every fence line, station track water trough etc in the NT.
                                The shitbox 79 is primarily a firefighting Ute so also has a 750L water tank, pump etc but does a lot
                                of long range remote travelling. Thankfully we get issued a car and get an almost free run setting it up so I have it pretty good for remote driving, just need to have Toyota sort the shit reliability.

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