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    Originally posted by mizone View Post
    I'll leave this here

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    That is actually a fairly normal way according to US aviation manuals.

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    Chris
    ------
    The MX5 Noujet (its up market) | The Hilux Complete Nugget
    I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself. - D.H.Lawrence

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      What is supposedly wrong with that split pin in the photo?

      Comment


        Originally posted by Shonky View Post
        What is supposedly wrong with that split pin in the photo?
        its not pointing north /south

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            Originally posted by 9triton View Post
            Click image for larger version

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            that's seen some corners

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              As an ex aircraft mechanic I was taught both methods. The up and down method was kinda taught as the quick lazy method. Big issue with up down is the tail across the top of the bolt is just sitting there waiting to rip your arm open when you reach in somewhere. The wrap around method doesn't have that issue plus typically it will wiggle less so less chance of it fatiguing and failing though not very likely in a car installation.

              Really the option you chose really came down to clearance plus sometimes the manual would specify a particular method in certain areas.

              Comment


                Originally posted by mizone View Post
                I'll leave this here

                Click image for larger version Name:	Castled Nut.jpg Views:	0 Size:	30.6 KB ID:	7259868
                In automotive applications I've heard it called the Rolls Royce method or the Rolls Royce twist. Used mainly because it looks more finished than simply shoving a split pin and bending the legs over the nut.

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                  Originally posted by takai View Post

                  That is actually a fairly normal way according to US aviation manuals.

                  Click image for larger version

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                  Originally posted by Shonky View Post
                  What is supposedly wrong with that split pin in the photo?
                  Nothing is wrong with the way in the photo I added, it's wrong in the photo of the Nissan posted before

                  Photo is from here somewhere. It's the correct way of doing it according to Rolls Royce
                  "That which does not kill you, will make you very, very sick" - so says mizones mum

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by Roadsailing View Post

                    that's seen some corners
                    Or dropped....

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by Luke352 View Post
                      As an ex aircraft mechanic I was taught both methods.
                      As an ex aircraft mech do you use Split or cotter terminology?

                      Or cotter when talking to other LAME's and split to carheads?.


                      Comment


                        Originally posted by mizone View Post



                        Nothing is wrong with the way in the photo I added, it's wrong in the photo of the Nissan posted before

                        Photo is from here somewhere. It's the correct way of doing it according to Rolls Royce
                        Both are acceptable according to the US training manuals, see the left hand middle image in that diagram.
                        Chris
                        ------
                        The MX5 Noujet (its up market) | The Hilux Complete Nugget
                        I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself. - D.H.Lawrence

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by takai View Post

                          Both are acceptable according to the US training manuals, see the left hand middle image in that diagram.
                          There would be some Xzibit level thinking going on if you had a cotter pin with a hole in the female threaded section and a castellated nut. "tighten the nut to fasten the cotter pin, then install a cotter pin in the cotter pin so the nut on the cotter pin doesn't come loose"

                          I'm sure i've seen a split pin called a cotter pin before.

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by 9triton View Post

                            As an ex aircraft mech do you use Split or cotter terminology?

                            Or cotter when talking to other LAME's and split to carheads?.

                            Cotter was probably more common in my experience. But that was somewhat background dependent. I was working on mostly defence stuff with mostly ex defence guys and Cotter seemed to be the terminology that was found in the manuals for the aircraft we worked on. But some manuals I'd seen use split pin instead and some guys used that terminology. Overall people understood you no matter which term you used.


                            I will add in that photo with the wrap around method they have placed the head vertically in the castellation so they have twisted the tails 90degs before wrapping them around. That is not what I was taught and I've not seen that before. We were taught pin lays flat so in that image you should be able to see the loop of the head sticking out of the castellation.

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by mizone View Post



                              Nothing is wrong with the way in the photo I added, it's wrong in the photo of the Nissan posted before

                              Photo is from here somewhere. It's the correct way of doing it according to Rolls Royce
                              Might have been me who posted it eons ago, I've been using that method since I was an apprentice.

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by Luke352 View Post

                                Cotter was probably more common in my experience. But that was somewhat background dependent. I was working on mostly defence stuff with mostly ex defence guys and Cotter seemed to be the terminology that was found in the manuals for the aircraft we worked on. But some manuals I'd seen use split pin instead and some guys used that terminology. Overall people understood you no matter which term you used.


                                I will add in that photo with the wrap around method they have placed the head vertically in the castellation so they have twisted the tails 90degs before wrapping them around. That is not what I was taught and I've not seen that before. We were taught pin lays flat so in that image you should be able to see the loop of the head sticking out of the castellation.
                                If they call a split pin a cotter pin, what do they call a cotter pin?

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                                Are you optimistic or pessimistic about the end of the world?

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