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New Tesla S has "Ludicrous Speed" mode - 0-100k in 2.8secs

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    FWIW I this is the computer gear that steers a self-driving car.

    "This circuit board enables autonomous driving. The black thingies are camera inputs, the big port on the right is for radar/lidar. Those two big chips each have as much processing power as the most powerful supercomputers in the U.S. In the year 2000."
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      I think if anything, 10 years ago people thought electric cars were a pipe-dream with one-off gimicks like the Leaf. With the Model S, Tesla has not only made it work, but they made something people WANT.
      Originally posted by Jack Nicholson
      Just when you think you've seen all the retardation humanity has to offer.....

      Comment


        Originally posted by Jack Nicholson View Post
        So to make a real high-performance electric vehicle, why not add a transmission which allows the electric motor to remain in it's peak torque range (up to 6000rpm according to that graph) across a road speed up to say, 300km/h?

        What is the current consumption of the motor vs rpm? Would there not also be some benefit of using gears to keep the motor at an efficient rpm?
        I don't remember a lot of the theory from uni, it was NOT one of my favourite subjects ... but from memory, I'm pretty sure they mess with the parameters of the electricity being fed to the motor as revs increase.
        So the phase will get fiddled, the windings being used will be switched or fiddled.
        You can do a lot more with fiddling the electrickery inputs to a smart electric motor than you can with fiddling cam & ignition & valve phasing/timing/lift/blah, across a wider direct range of revs.
        A decent amount of drivetrain loss occurs in the gearbox, so remove the gearbox & efficiency is upped ... plus there's the whole concept of a motor at each wheel etc, meaning you don't want to be running through multiple gearboxes (don't the AWD Teslas run multiple motors?).
        Soft roaders represent an excellent compromise between the needs of the hardcore 4x4 user and the convenience of a city hatchback. Its clear to see why they have become so popular in todays society.

        Comment


          Originally posted by Forg View Post
          I don't remember a lot of the theory from uni, it was NOT one of my favourite subjects ... but from memory, I'm pretty sure they mess with the parameters of the electricity being fed to the motor as revs increase.
          So the phase will get fiddled, the windings being used will be switched or fiddled.
          You can do a lot more with fiddling the electrickery inputs to a smart electric motor than you can with fiddling cam & ignition & valve phasing/timing/lift/blah, across a wider direct range of revs.
          A decent amount of drivetrain loss occurs in the gearbox, so remove the gearbox & efficiency is upped ... plus there's the whole concept of a motor at each wheel etc, meaning you don't want to be running through multiple gearboxes (don't the AWD Teslas run multiple motors?).
          They'll be using AC motors, with the electrickery box they'll be able to vary the timing of the poles & stuff in the motor so it gives the maximum torque it can with the rpm, factored by the amount of power it's required to make. (throttle position, etc)

          Comment


            Originally posted by Jack Nicholson View Post
            So to make a real high-performance electric vehicle, why not add a transmission which allows the electric motor to remain in it's peak torque range (up to 6000rpm according to that graph) across a road speed up to say, 300km/h?

            What is the current consumption of the motor vs rpm? Would there not also be some benefit of using gears to keep the motor at an efficient rpm?

            I don't know, that's why i'm asking, just putting it out there...
            I have thought about that myself
            If Tesla couple the electric motor to a good CVT transmission, then it could keep the electric motor in it's optimum torque band, which would also theoretically give it an impressive top end as well.

            But Tesla is fast enough, I don't want it to get any faster or it's going to take away any advantage our beloved petrol powered cars have

            Comment


              Originally posted by Billzilla View Post
              FWIW I this is the computer gear that steers a self-driving car.

              "This circuit board enables autonomous driving. The black thingies are camera inputs, the big port on the right is for radar/lidar. Those two big chips each have as much processing power as the most powerful supercomputers in the U.S. In the year 2000."
              crazy huh...
              who would have thought a predominately gaming graphics card manufacturer would be building hardware to drive a car!

              Comment


                OK I found it (I think) http://my.teslamotors.com/it_CH/foru...s-motor-output

                14'000rpm @ 120mph, so that'd be 7000rpm @ 60mph, no wonder it doesn't trap well if it's dropping off the torque band at 6000rpm.

                I was thinking about a more traditional transmission rather than a CVT, which would also make the car a bit more interactive to drive (based on my mates reasons for deciding against it).

                And as for losses, i'm sure a modern trans with 10% losses will more than make up for the 75% of it's torque lost between 6000 and 14'000 rpm...
                Jaguar XJR, Freelander 2 HSE, Jaguar XKR, MINI Cooper S
                Originally posted by nutttr
                People must assume you are some sort of drug dealer with all these nice cars turning up to a fibro home

                Comment


                  Originally posted by Jack Nicholson View Post
                  So to make a real high-performance electric vehicle, why not add a transmission which allows the electric motor to remain in it's peak torque range (up to 6000rpm according to that graph) across a road speed up to say, 300km/h?
                  From what I understand, Tesla played with a 2 speed transmission in the early roadster prototypes, but found that they had a nasty tenancy of exploding from the torque. Rather than make the gearbox bigger to handle it, it was cheaper and simpler to add batteries to get the performance up.
                  Imagination is more important than knowledge.

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by ben wilson View Post
                    from what i understand, tesla played with a 2 speed transmission in the early roadster prototypes, but found that they had a nasty tenancy of exploding from the torque. Rather than make the gearbox bigger to handle it, it was cheaper and simpler to add batteries to get the performance up.

                    tendency
                    ........................................

                    Suzuki Mighty Boy / BEC Rear Mid mount Suzuki 1150cc 450kg Hillclimber [in the build]

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by Jack Nicholson View Post
                      And as for losses, i'm sure a modern trans with 10% losses will more than make up for the 75% of it's torque lost between 6000 and 14'000 rpm...
                      I guess that would depend on "road car" vs "race car" (or "for sale in Germany car")?
                      120mph ... I don't think I've ever been in a car doing more than ~105mph, outside of Germany.
                      Soft roaders represent an excellent compromise between the needs of the hardcore 4x4 user and the convenience of a city hatchback. Its clear to see why they have become so popular in todays society.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by VHSS View Post
                        That's why I suspect the supercar manufacturers who are getting into electric power, are still tending to stick with combined electric and IC engine power. Electric gives it the impressive launch, petrol power for the top end power/speed
                        Actually, the trend is heading towards "torque fill"- elec motor masking the lag of the enormous turbo hanging off the ICE.

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by Forg View Post
                          I guess that would depend on "road car" vs "race car" (or "for sale in Germany car")?
                          120mph ... I don't think I've ever been in a car doing more than ~105mph, outside of Germany.
                          I don't even know how to reply to this...
                          Jaguar XJR, Freelander 2 HSE, Jaguar XKR, MINI Cooper S
                          Originally posted by nutttr
                          People must assume you are some sort of drug dealer with all these nice cars turning up to a fibro home

                          Comment


                            Yes yes, it's Matt fucking Farah but a good insight on this car. It's no tesla but might actually be engaging..

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by Dave75 View Post
                              tendency
                              I blame the phone
                              Imagination is more important than knowledge.

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by Jack Nicholson View Post
                                I don't even know how to reply to this...
                                How about "I regularly drive around in Australia at 200+km/h, so different gearing is important to me" ... ?
                                Soft roaders represent an excellent compromise between the needs of the hardcore 4x4 user and the convenience of a city hatchback. Its clear to see why they have become so popular in todays society.

                                Comment

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