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    Yeah, they were supplying subaru with the cleaner for years and works every bit as good as the SA459 cleaner ever did/does. Not sure if threebond still supply it. But its easier to find for the same job if you arent near a subie dealer.
    Originally posted by Buford T. Justice
    This happens every time one of these floozies starts poontangin' around with those show folk fags.

    Comment


      Takai , Yep have used it on the Ranger before I did DPF delete and EGR block off.
      2017 Ford Ranger XLT (Jeep Wrangler recovery vehicle)
      2007 KTM 250 SX

      Originally posted by Monza
      I've never considered myself the type of guy to eat arse but I am currently reviewing that policy

      Comment


        Originally posted by gmx View Post
        Dumping fluid from oil coolers, along with the sump.

        Obv question may be obvious... prime the coolers or just let the car build pressure during idle?
        When I do a full drain of the cooler core and lines, after everything is back together and refilled, I disconnect the plug for the ignitor, and just do 5 or 6 short cranks before reconnecting the igntior, just to try and prime the lines and coooler as much as possible before starting it up.

        Comment


          ^ Whyfor’s the reason for doing that? Stuff’s being pumped anyway, except surely faster once the engine’s running? Is the idea to get the lines primed while revs stay low ... ?
          Soft roaders represent an excellent compromise between the needs of the hardcore 4x4 user and the convenience of a city hatchback. Its clear to see why they have become so popular in todays society.

          Comment



            Originally posted by Mr Ree View Post

            When I do a full drain of the cooler core and lines, after everything is back together and refilled, I disconnect the plug for the ignitor, and just do 5 or 6 short cranks before reconnecting the igntior, just to try and prime the lines and coooler as much as possible before starting it up.
            Sweet, I'll do something similar.


            I've asked this before in this thread and got an answer "doesn't matter" which I agree with.
            Looking for reassurance due to self-doubt etc... I run the inlet and outlet feeds via the bottom of the oil cooler cores. There is no room on the top, headlight ballast is in the way. If I move the core lower, routing the crossover line becomes impossible and risks rubbing through, springing an eventual leak. Would require 180 deg bends as well. Anyway my rebuttals to hypothetical cunts:
            1) Oil cannot drain back to the sump like some idiots copy pasta from some JDM car forum because the coolers are mounted way below the thermostat. The thermostat/filter/oil housing assembly is at the top on these engines. The lines run down to the front left and (via single crossover) right bumper vents. And finally back up to the oil filter housing/thermo.
            2) I also don't see how 25-70psi oil pressure will create an air lock in any situation unless the pump is starved itself in the sump.
            3) I run the cores in series, each setrab core has a pressure drop spec of 2.4psi (obv depends on lines, oil temp and viscosity). Adding a second one and some lines is fuck all. Why do cunts insist on parallel twins? If 2) is genuinely a problem, I guess this is part of the solution.

            Solution is really just swap a V8/10 in. N54 is a turd.
            Last edited by gmx; 21-06-20, 12:51 PM.

            Comment


              Run a check valve if there’s a chance of back flow and emptying itself
              Oil pumps are positive displacement so will push all air out.
              2017 Ford Ranger XLT (Jeep Wrangler recovery vehicle)
              2007 KTM 250 SX

              Originally posted by Monza
              I've never considered myself the type of guy to eat arse but I am currently reviewing that policy

              Comment


                After someone mentioned slipping clutches in another thread, it made me wonder ...

                On advice of Americans, I initially fitted a puck-style clutch to the Volvo (organic material not brass), which was a Little Bit Shit around town mostly due to the fact that the engine's a bit grumpy so low torque & relatively little slippage down low wasn't great.
                I did that because the standard clutch slips a treat if you go around doubling+ the standard torque.

                Anyhoo, a few years later my trusted mechanic sent me to some clutch-specialist person out Campbelltown way, and they sold me a clutch which was then fitted.
                It slips as nicely on take-off as a standard clutch, it handles the torques, it's no heavier to use than standard (hydraulic clutch).

                I thought that HD clutches were supposed to feel really heavy & hence be a bit hard to use; is that a Thing from old Australian cars that didn't have hydraulic clutches like eveyrthing else did?
                How come I can get a clutch that engages/disengages as smoothly as a stock-spec one, without it being heavier to use? Better friction material?
                Soft roaders represent an excellent compromise between the needs of the hardcore 4x4 user and the convenience of a city hatchback. Its clear to see why they have become so popular in todays society.

                Comment


                  Originally posted by Captiva Fan View Post
                  After someone mentioned slipping clutches in another thread, it made me wonder ...

                  On advice of Americans, I initially fitted a puck-style clutch to the Volvo (organic material not brass), which was a Little Bit Shit around town mostly due to the fact that the engine's a bit grumpy so low torque & relatively little slippage down low wasn't great.
                  I did that because the standard clutch slips a treat if you go around doubling+ the standard torque.

                  Anyhoo, a few years later my trusted mechanic sent me to some clutch-specialist person out Campbelltown way, and they sold me a clutch which was then fitted.
                  It slips as nicely on take-off as a standard clutch, it handles the torques, it's no heavier to use than standard (hydraulic clutch).

                  I thought that HD clutches were supposed to feel really heavy & hence be a bit hard to use; is that a Thing from old Australian cars that didn't have hydraulic clutches like eveyrthing else did?
                  How come I can get a clutch that engages/disengages as smoothly as a stock-spec one, without it being heavier to use? Better friction material?
                  Welcome to modern technology !!

                  Don't mention the adBlocker !!

                  Comment


                    Altered pivot points. Exedy HD clutches for example feel stock. The clutch plate is same as standard, the cover has extra clamping force.

                    Would love to see pics of this organic puck clutch you had. Never seen one.

                    Also that clutch specialist in Campbelltown has been gone for at least 10 years.

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by Do the safety dance. View Post
                      Altered pivot points. Exedy HD clutches for example feel stock. The clutch plate is same as standard, the cover has extra clamping force.
                      OK - actually that makes sense, in concept at least.

                      Would love to see pics of this organic puck clutch you had. Never seen one.
                      Sorry, I gave it away as I had no use for it, didn't take any photos.
                      It was a 5-puck from memory, the friction material was quite a bright orange initially (looked like a type of rough plastic), more of a "burnt orange" when I took it out with only a few thousand km's on it.

                      Also that clutch specialist in Campbelltown has been gone for at least 10 years.
                      Ah crap, hard to believe it's been so long, especially as the first rego was 2005 & my memory was that the clutch stuff was fixed THIS side of halfway between then & now.
                      That's gonna suck when I eventually need a replacement & need to take it somewhere & point at it while being totally clueless & say "I needz uh replace this" ...
                      Soft roaders represent an excellent compromise between the needs of the hardcore 4x4 user and the convenience of a city hatchback. Its clear to see why they have become so popular in todays society.

                      Comment


                        Normally, increases in pedal weight is caused by increases in pressure plate clamping force ( has been upgraded with greater number of straps, thicker straps or thicker diaphragm springs/fingers) and its why they felt heavier. But better friction materials = better transmission without ramping up the clamping force of the pressure plate, and as mentioned above, changing the leverage on the rings of the pressure plate to overcome the added clamping force will keep it feeling light. Surface area of the clutch/flywheel makes a difference too, and in some cases changing the size of the slave or master might be required to get the desired result. It's why there's more to just slapping on an upgraded clutch if you actually care about how it feels/operates.
                        Last edited by Madhatr; 30-06-20, 09:48 AM.
                        Originally posted by Buford T. Justice
                        This happens every time one of these floozies starts poontangin' around with those show folk fags.

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by Captiva Fan View Post

                          It was a 5-puck from memory, the friction material was quite a bright orange initially (looked like a type of rough plastic), more of a "burnt orange" when I took it out with only a few thousand km's on it.
                          That's a brass button clutch by the sounds of it. A 5 puck will be less aggressive than a 3 puck, and it likely had a sprung centre.
                          ​​​​​

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by Captiva Fan View Post
                            ^ Whyfor’s the reason for doing that? Stuff’s being pumped anyway, except surely faster once the engine’s running? Is the idea to get the lines primed while revs stay low ... ?
                            If my oil lines and cooler core were made of glass, I would be able to categorically state that I do the multiple short cranks without starting the engine, to prime the lines and expel the air pockets from the core, and to avoid any potential engine wear caused by a moment of inadequate oil flow until the pressure built back up.

                            Given I cant see whats actually happening, its all just theoretical, but I still fell better doing it, than not doing it, and just hoping for the best hahaha

                            Comment


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                              I just threw VT brake hub adapters on my VH and followed that. It feels fine, and it's what the factory manual says to do so I'm sure it's fine. But the idea of leaving a nut slightly loose when that's the one that holds the the wheels on is nerve racking. I watched Scotty do his on carnage and it looked like he didn't go mental and give it 50 ugga duggas on the VN build but if someone else that knows VB-VP commodores can ease my suffering that'd be appreciated.

                              Comment


                                I don't think a teeny tiny bit of preload would matter. You are aiming for essentially no preload and no freeplay. Or a bees dick of freeplay when cold, so it gets perfect when warm.
                                My old boss in Alice used to run preload on all his Isuzu truck wheel bearings so they didn't hammer to bits on corrugations. Never had any dramas with them, provided they were regreased regularly.
                                Last edited by BigJonWB; 30-06-20, 08:11 PM.

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