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    Most powder coating is electrostatic (like when rub a balloon across your hair and it gets attracted to the balloon), so the part has to be electrically conductive so it can attract the electrostatically charged powder. That prevents wasting powder as most of the powder dispensed ends up on the part. Afaik powder coating of non-conductive parts like wood and plastic requires heating the part so that any powder which touches it partially melts on contact causing it to stick. The latter is more wasteful as most of the powder isn't actively attracted towards the part.

    I can't imagine the anodising would cause a problem for electrostatic attraction, only issue would be getting a good electrical connection to the part via the ground lead. Electrical clamp would have to bite through anodized layer, marking the surface, but this is no big deal just do it in an inconspicuous location.

    It's my understanding that anodized alloy is a problem for powdercoating because the anodizing makes chemical cleaning of the surface difficult, so abrasive methods need to be used. A lot of powder coating mobs aren't like an automotive body shop - they can't be bothered bead blasting or sanding parts by hand, so if it can't be chemically prepared for coating they aren't interested.
    Last edited by TMM; 07-10-20, 10:56 PM.

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      Originally posted by Norbie View Post

      This very much depends on the turbo. Some have miles of room to access the fittings, others are a tight squeeze. For the latter banjo bolts are your best bet.
      I guess i do have a little space, but do i want to sit there and do 700 1/12th turns to tighten or a bango. thanks for the help Norbie.
      CISCOKIDS
      The Gentlemen's Club
      Midnight Rocker

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        This one seems to divide opinions - jacking the rear of a car up under the diff - yay or nay? I've done it plenty with a block of wood on the jack/under the diff to lift it and stands under the axle tubes either side. Recently read some varied opinions about it putting too much strain on mounting points, potential to bend shit (axle tubes) etc. I've never really given it a second thought?
        Hide yo' wife!!!

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          hmm. just thinkin about it, surely it can't be putting any more load on these points than those applied whilst driving? ...ie loads already considered in the design?
          Jim.

          VS ute appreciation society

          (you know it makes sense..)

          Comment


            Originally posted by kgc10-R View Post
            hmm. just thinkin about it, surely it can't be putting any more load on these points than those applied whilst driving? ...ie loads already considered in the design?
            I can't see how the loads on the chassis are particularly changed, but the loads on the axles and/or whatever the tubes called which cover the axles in a beam-axle would be abnormal.
            I'm not sure my diff housing is strong enough to cope with the weight of the car on it, either.
            Soft roaders represent an excellent compromise between the needs of the hardcore 4x4 user and the convenience of a city hatchback. Its clear to see why they have become so popular in todays society.

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              I wouldn't jack a diff. The housing is not mean to support the whole vehicle and I would think there's some chance of temporarily deforming it at least with 1-2 tons or more of weight on it.

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                I've done it to every Toyota I've owned in the last 25 years (both live axle and IRS) and there's never been any issue, but maybe it can be a problem in some cars?
                Norbie!

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                  No problem.

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                    If it's a vaguely solid looking beam steel housing think you will be fine.

                    Take an 1800kg sedan, assume 1,000kg front/800kg rear bias. So, the jack under the diff is lifting 800kg.

                    Each diff tube takes half the weight, so 400kg. From the center of the diff to the spring mounts - say, 50cm. Diff tube is 8-10cm in size..

                    If you're talking something multi link and made out of alloy, Potentially a different story.

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                      I actually wrote "I doubt the load jacking it up is any more than ripping a skid" I've also always figured it was only holding half the weight of the car too being the back end in the air and all that's back there is the diff/wheels/shocks/fuel tank - for my car even if I said it was a 50/50 weight split we're talking 630kg's give or take.
                      Hide yo' wife!!!

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                        Stupid laptop shut down, but what 36 said! It's the stock steel 10 bolt chev housing for the record, it does have an aluminium braced diff cover (I haven't jacked it up since that went on but would try and avoid putting weight on that)
                        Last edited by piss98; 09-10-20, 11:52 AM.
                        Hide yo' wife!!!

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                          Originally posted by Norbie View Post
                          I've done it to every Toyota I've owned in the last 25 years (both live axle and IRS) and there's never been any issue, but maybe it can be a problem in some cars?
                          No problem with BMW's either. It's actually a jack point in their own TIS. Obviously, there are idiots out there that do on bad sections of the diff or worse, the fin pack on the rear cover.
                          No idea about about the beam for a jack stand point though.

                          Comment


                            It's not even half the weight you're jacking up remember even on a 50/50 car.
                            Weight shifts fowards as you lift it, so unless you're jacking up on a steep incline you're probably only looking at a few hundred kgs.
                            Last edited by Sturmovik; 09-10-20, 12:52 PM.

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                              Originally posted by gmx View Post

                              No problem with BMW's either. It's actually a jack point in their own TIS. Obviously, there are idiots out there that do on bad sections of the diff or worse, the fin pack on the rear cover.
                              No idea about about the beam for a jack stand point though.
                              E46 rear jack point is not on the main pairt of the diff body - it's the carrier thing in front. It's forward of the diff and I think that's where some confusion comes into it.
                              Last edited by Shonky; 09-10-20, 02:41 PM.

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by Shonky View Post
                                I wouldn't jack a diff. The housing is not mean to support the whole vehicle and I would think there's some chance of temporarily deforming it at least with 1-2 tons or more of weight on it.
                                Originally posted by Shonky View Post
                                E46 rear jack point is not on the main part of the diff body - it's the carrier thing in front. It's forward of the diff and I think that's where some confusion comes into it.
                                Like Women, every car is a bit different as to where to stick your jack.

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