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    Originally posted by Luke352 View Post

    The answer is always Michelin Pilot Sport 4 or the 4s for something hotter but decent price jump between 4 and 4s.

    Even if you found someone to pass those tyres personally i'd be looking to replace them anyway.
    Those would be ideal, can't seem to find them in 225/50/R16 though

    Have just ordered some Dunlop DIREZZA DZ102 via Tyresales.
    If I had some spare rims I'd just chuck those on for a roady or something, but alas I do not.

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      Originally posted by Faux Forg View Post

      Hey Cock Fist , is this new guy a bot or what?
      If he is, he's a pretty shitty one - hasn't tried to advertise anything yet.
      Swedish Soot Chucker
      Orange Accident KE10

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        ANCAP ratings... say two cars have an identical rating but one is say 2000kg and bigger compared to 1600kg and smaller, are they both as ‘safe’ as each other or is the bigger and heavier car safer because, well, physics.

        Comment


          Originally posted by Cock Fist View Post

          If he is, he's a pretty shitty one - hasn't tried to advertise anything yet.
          Maybe it's an AI trying to learn. We could turn it into a Neo Nazi feminist who likes the colour pink and waffles.
          "Keep lowering your standards until you achieve a goal" - Mike Finnegan

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            Heaviest car usually wins. Smaller car becomes its crumple zone.
            But if it's vs a brick wall, maybe they are equal...good question..

            Comment


              Originally posted by Falc&Send View Post
              Does a car get better fuel economy when coasting (say down a hill) in top gear or in neutral, at ~100km/h? Would there be a difference auto vs manual?
              Originally posted by Sturmovik View Post
              Anything euro 4 spec must not use fuel while coasting in gear. So putting it in neutral will cause the car to use more fuel.
              Originally posted by BigJonWB View Post

              Anything modern will have injector cut on over run, so zero fuel use. Vs slight fuel use at idle. I have seen dash readouts on Falcons show about 1.5 litres per hour at idle.
              The answer is, it depends.

              Anything VW with a DCT actually Neutral coasts sometimes. We've got a '17 or '18 A4 and it pops up a little image on the dash telling you to take your foot off the accelerator and the gear display goes from D4, D5 etc. to just D and the revs drop to idle. But if you touch the brakes or accelerator the car re-engages gear. I've heard of other manufacturers doing the same thing. Car is obviously monitoring torque load (amongst other things probably) between engine and gearbox and if load drops to zero or negative for a given time it prompts you to lift your foot and it disengages both clutches and just lets you coast along, it is quite amazing how long you can coast along for holding speed on what appears to be fairly flat ground vs. a traditional auto or manual car when left in gear. What's interesting is that I remember being taught neutral coasting was a big no no and actually illegal (?). Guess it's like quite a few things in govco's eyes, bad if I do it but sunshine and daisies if a manufacturer does it.

              Thinking about it logically if it is a very minor to average slope if left in gear it is very likely you will still need some throttle input in order to maintain speed depending on the engine and the cars natural rolling resistance, so you'd be using more fuel then if the car neutral coasted at idle. If the slope is steep enough that you need some form of retardation (gravity effect is greater than cars rolling resistance) then leaving it in gear will probably be better and more fuel efficient. This is essentially what VW are doing if the system detects you can coast it will tell you lift off and let the car coast, but if you have to apply the brakes to manage your speed then it reengages gear as that will be more efficient then neutral coasting in that situation.

              So despite all the articles on the internet by supposed experts claiming neutral coasting is worse for economy the manufacturers deem differently. You can also find lots of articles on SAE talking about various neutral coasting implementations.
              Last edited by Luke352; 09-05-21, 06:45 PM.

              Comment


                Originally posted by ifuckingloveCUM!!! View Post
                ANCAP ratings... say two cars have an identical rating but one is say 2000kg and bigger compared to 1600kg and smaller, are they both as ‘safe’ as each other or is the bigger and heavier car safer because, well, physics.
                Isn't that normal a case of "it depends on the incident"?

                As in, head on impact between those two cars, heavier might be safer. But single vehicle incident or other styles of collisions it may be a different story?
                BMW E21 Racer

                ATCC & V8SC Results, Data, Statistics and Discussion from 1960 to now

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                  A 2t car would need to be significantly stronger to meet the same standards that a 1.6t meets.
                  I imagine adding 400kg to the 1.6t car would change the crash dynamics significantly.

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by ifuckingloveCUM!!! View Post
                    ANCAP ratings... say two cars have an identical rating but one is say 2000kg and bigger compared to 1600kg and smaller, are they both as ‘safe’ as each other or is the bigger and heavier car safer because, well, physics.
                    Depends on the cars.

                    ANCAP ratings are not just about how well your car crashes into a wall. Cars are also assessed on stuff like how they injure pedestrians, content such as seat belt reminders, active safety stuff.. So, your two cars with an identical ANCAP star ratings may have built their ratings in different ways. Need to dig into the details, it can be quite surprising.

                    For instance, a Kia Optima protects occupants better than a BMW 6 Series GT, both are 5 star ANCAP. If you are going to have a frontal offset crash, or crash into a pole, choose the Optima. Conversely, the BMW protects pedestrians better.

                    Size & weight? Ideally, you would have the biggest possible car to maximise crumple zone. Crash survival is primarily about how you decelerate the human body.

                    If the two cars perform equally on the individual crash types tested by ANCAP, then choose the one that does the best skids.

                    Comment


                      At some stage ANCAP 4 star and ANCAP 5 star ratings on some cars came down to seatbelt warning flashers for the rear seats in the “new model”.
                      ---
                      Shed Project: 1994 Laser Lynx with BP-T

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by Ribfeast View Post


                        Those would be ideal, can't seem to find them in 225/50/R16 though

                        Have just ordered some Dunlop DIREZZA DZ102 via Tyresales.
                        If I had some spare rims I'd just chuck those on for a roady or something, but alas I do not.
                        Sorry I'm a day late here. I've got the DZ102's on my falcon. Pretty average in the wet. OK in the dry.
                        The best reasonably priced tyres I've had in the wet were Yokohama AE50. I'll be going back to them next time.

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by Aaron View Post
                          At some stage ANCAP 4 star and ANCAP 5 star ratings on some cars came down to seatbelt warning flashers for the rear seats in the “new model”.
                          Yeah I think that was Falcon v Commodore nearly 10 years back. Both were 4 stars and then bang, Falcon put the rear seat belt warning on and became 5 stars. Within 2 or 3 months Commodore did the same and both were 5 stars.

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by Luke352 View Post





                            The answer is, it depends.

                            Anything VW with a DCT actually Neutral coasts sometimes. We've got a '17 or '18 A4 and it pops up a little image on the dash telling you to take your foot off the accelerator and the gear display goes from D4, D5 etc. to just D and the revs drop to idle. But if you touch the brakes or accelerator the car re-engages gear. I've heard of other manufacturers doing the same thing. Car is obviously monitoring torque load (amongst other things probably) between engine and gearbox and if load drops to zero or negative for a given time it prompts you to lift your foot and it disengages both clutches and just lets you coast along, it is quite amazing how long you can coast along for holding speed on what appears to be fairly flat ground vs. a traditional auto or manual car when left in gear. What's interesting is that I remember being taught neutral coasting was a big no no and actually illegal (?). Guess it's like quite a few things in govco's eyes, bad if I do it but sunshine and daisies if a manufacturer does it.

                            Thinking about it logically if it is a very minor to average slope if left in gear it is very likely you will still need some throttle input in order to maintain speed depending on the engine and the cars natural rolling resistance, so you'd be using more fuel then if the car neutral coasted at idle. If the slope is steep enough that you need some form of retardation (gravity effect is greater than cars rolling resistance) then leaving it in gear will probably be better and more fuel efficient. This is essentially what VW are doing if the system detects you can coast it will tell you lift off and let the car coast, but if you have to apply the brakes to manage your speed then it reengages gear as that will be more efficient then neutral coasting in that situation.

                            So despite all the articles on the internet by supposed experts claiming neutral coasting is worse for economy the manufacturers deem differently. You can also find lots of articles on SAE talking about various neutral coasting implementations.
                            Yeah thanks for the detailed response (and JonWB and Sturmovik also). I thought it might vary depending on the vehicle. Was surprised to learn a (modern) car uses no fuel on the overun.
                            Also never knew it was illegal to coast down a hill in neutral!

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by Falc&Send View Post

                              Also never knew it was illegal to coast down a hill in neutral!
                              I'm not sure on the illegal bit but I do remember neutral coasting was one of the things you could fail your license test on.

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by SesameSeedBun View Post
                                Yeah I think that was Falcon v Commodore nearly 10 years back. Both were 4 stars and then bang, Falcon put the rear seat belt warning on and became 5 stars. Within 2 or 3 months Commodore did the same and both were 5 stars.
                                It's become a bit of a joke but a great marketing exercise for those that don't know. Bit like food star ratings. 5 stars on biscuits and 5 stars on fruit are different. 5 star biscuits are the healthiest chocolate biscuit, not a comparison to fruit but other chocolate biscuits.But to the average punter they are both five stars so the biscuits must be good!

                                "Keep lowering your standards until you achieve a goal" - Mike Finnegan

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