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    #61
    The two RBR articles are interesting, good rule summary.

    http://www.infiniti-redbullracing.co...-new-ball-game
    A WHOLE NEW BALL GAME
    January 15, 2014

    The 2014 season will see F1 undergo the most comprehensive set of regulation changes it has seen for in many decades.
    From the introduction of complex new turbocharged, hybrid 'power units', to revised front and rear wing geometries, altered nose heights and new laws governing exhausts, this year's cars will be radically different.
    But it's not only the technical laws that have changed. The rules governing how the sport conducts itself have had just as massive a make-over and this year will see the introduction of driver penalty points, permanent race numbers and double points at the final race.
    It's as big a set of changes as the sport has ever seen and getting to grips with them will give the teams no end of headaches. You too no doubt, so here's our handy guide to the biggest changes coming your way in 2014.
    Sporting Regulation Changes 2014

    Penalty Points (Article 4.2)
    Starting this season drivers may accumulate penalty points on their Super Licence as a result of race incidents and rule infringements, should the Race Stewards deem it necessary. As with the road licences of some countries if a driver accrues 12 penalty points his licence will be suspended for the following event, following which the 12 points will be removed from the licence. Penalty points will remain on a driver's Super Licence for a period of 12 months, after which they will be respectively removed on the 12-month anniversary of their imposition.

    Double Points at Final Race of the Season (Article 6.4)
    Controversial and still the subject of some discussion, this season will see double points awarded at the final race of the season in a bid to maintain interest in the championship should there be significant gaps in the Championship order in the closing stages of the season. It means that victory in Abu Dhabi this season will be worth 50 points, second place will be worth 36 points and so on.

    Pole Position Trophy (Article 6.7)
    A trophy will be awarded to the driver who sets the most pole positions during the season. In the event of a tie the holder of the greatest number of second places in qualifying will be taken into account and so on down the order of a driver's results until a winner is established. If this fails to produce a result, the FIA will nominate the winner according to such criteria as it thinks fit.

    Extra Friday Drivers (Article 19.1)
    Teams will this year be allowed to run more than one driver per car during Friday practice sessions. In the past the driver nominated for the session would have to drive the whole session, but under the new regulation one or two of our Test and Reserve drivers could undertake part of FP1 or FP2 before handing the car over to one of the race drivers. To facilitate this and in a bid to increase running in the opening part of sessions, an extra set of the weekend's harder (Prime) compound tyres is being made available to teams but only for use in the first 30 minutes of each session. Each side of the garage will now have access to seven sets of Primes and five sets of Option tyres for the weekend, with three sets of each being reserved for qualifying and the race.

    Cars Leaving the Track and Gaining an Advantage (Article 20.2)
    The subject of some discussion (and ire on the part of drivers) during last season, the rule covering the drivers leaving the track and gaining a perceived advantage has been tweaked so that a punishment of ceding back any advantage gained is now at the discretion of Race Director Charlie Whiting. This is aimed at avoiding the frequent imposition of drive-through penalties for infractions, penalties which could severely compromise a driver's race. Drive-throughs are still available to the Race Stewards should the incident demand it, however.

    Driver Numbers (Article 21.2)
    For those of us who have, since 1996, got used to drivers being numbered according to who's the champion and then by Constructors' Championship finish from the previous season, this year's numbering, in which drivers are being allowed to choose their own number (which will remain with them for the duration of the their F1 career) is going to be just a little bit confusing! Number one is still reserved for the champion, however, should he wish to use it. Seb has already opted to keep his #1 status (though he will revert to #5 should he not win this year's crown), while Daniel has opted for #3.
    Elsewhere, Ferrari's Kimi Raikkonen will be #7, team-mate Fernando Alonso has chosen #14 and Mercedes' Lewis Hamilton is #44, the number he used in his karting days. McLaren's Jenson Button has chosen #22, the number of the Brawn GP car which took him to his 2009 world title. Wonder what happens when a driver exits F1, his number is given away and then the first driver returns for another stint?

    In-Season Testing (Article 22.6 g/h)
    After an experimental return to in-season testing in 2012 with one test at Mugello, and none last year, this year it's back with a vengeance. There will be four two-day in-season tests allowed, with Bahrain's BIC (April), Spain's Circuit de Catalunya (May), Britain's Silverstone (July) and Abu Dhabi's Yas Marina (November) staging the tests in the wake of each country's grand prix. One of the eight test days available must be allocated to Pirelli for tyre testing.

    Pit stop Car Release (Article 23.12)
    The FIA has tightened the rules governing car release from pit stops following a number of incidents in recent seasons. If a car is deemed to have been released in an unsafe condition during any practice session, the stewards may drop the driver any number of grid positions they consider appropriate. Meanwhile, in the case of an unsafe release during a race the driver concerned will receive a 10-grid place penalty at the following race. However, if any car released in an unsafe condition is able to resume the race a 10-second stop-go penalty will also be imposed for the current race. If the infringement is within the final three laps of the race, the driver will have 30 seconds added to his race time.

    Weighing (Article 26.1 iii)
    A reprimand will be imposed on any driver who fails to stop when signalled to do so, provided the car is then brought back to the FIA garage without delay and that the FIA technical delegate is satisfied the car has been brought back in exactly the same condition it was in when it was driven into the pits. This is a lesser punishment that has been issued in previous years. Any driver who fails to stop when asked to do so, and then fails to bring the car back to the FIA garage, or if work is carried out on the car before it is returned to the FIA garage, will be required to start the race from the pit lane.

    Power Units (Article 28.4)
    Drivers will be able to use five of the new power units this season. This, though, is more complicated than it first appears, as the power unit is deemed to comprise six elements, which can be moved between units should the need arise. Drivers will be able to use five each of the following: the engine (ICE), the motor generator unit-kinetic (MGU-K), the motor generator unit-heat (MGU-H), the energy store (ES), turbocharger (TC) and control electronics (CE). Each element can be rotated among units.
    Should a driver use more than five of any one of the elements a grid penalty will be imposed at the first event during which each additional element is used.
    The first time a driver uses a sixth element, a ten-place grid penalty will be imposed. Different sixth elements used later will incur a five-place grid penalty. The first time a driver uses a seventh element, a ten-place grid penalty will be imposed. Different seventh elements used later will incur a five-place grid penalty and so on...If a grid penalty is imposed, and the driver's grid position is such that the full penalty cannot be applied, the remainder of the penalty will be applied at the driver's next race. However, no remaining penalties will be carried forward for more than one race.

    Six-Race Gearboxes (Article 28.6)
    Since 2011 driver's have had to use gearboxes for five races, but this year the number has risen to six. As previously, drivers who don't finish a race will be allowed to fit a new gearbox for the following race without penalty.

    Fuel Use (Article 29.5)
    No car is permitted to use more than 100kg of fuel, from the time of the race start until the time it crosses the line at the end of the race. Other than in accepted cases of force majeure any driver exceeding the 100kg maximum will be excluded from the race result.

    Wind Tunnel and CFD Testing Restrictions (Appendix 8)
    The FIA has heavily cut the amount of time teams are allowed to test in wind tunnels and in CFD. A complicated set of formulae have been set to assess the amount of time teams spend on such testing and after proscribed eight-week timeframes teams must declare in writing details of its Restricted Wind Tunnel Testing and Restricted CFD Simulations.

    (wtf character limit?)
    Chris
    ------
    The new nugget
    I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself. - D.H.Lawrence

    Comment


      #62
      http://www.infiniti-redbullracing.co...hnical-changes
      A WHOLE NEW BALL GAME (TECHNICAL CHANGES)
      January 20, 2014

      New season, new rules, new cars... so what's new about that? Every year the technical regulations governing F1 are rewritten, and every year the cars produced to those regulations are different to the cars that have gone before – so why the hulabaloo about 2014?
      Simply put, the changes between the 2013 and 2014 specifications are massive. It's not just a tweak to the regs, it's the start of an entirely new era. Of the thousands of parts that go into making a Formula One car, almost none are carried over from the RB9 into the RB10. We've seen these defining step-changes before in the 60-odd year history of the sport – but if you were to argue this is the biggest transformation of the lot, you wouldn't hear too many dissenting voices.
      So, in broad brush teams, here's what new, front to back for 2014 on the technical side of the operation...
      Front Wing
      The span of the front wing is narrowing from 1800mm to 1650mm. It may not sound like much but it's a change that places the wing endplates more obviously in line with the front tyres, giving designers a decision to make regarding which way to direct airflow.
      Nose
      There's a big change to the height of the nose tip, which drops from a maximum height of 550mm to a maximum of 185mm. The high nose has been useful for guiding airflow under the car – but it's also viewed as a risk in 'launching' accidents where one car impacts the rear of another and flies into the air. Mark Webber's collision with Heikki Kovalainen in Valencia being a prime example. It may prove effective but it isn't necessarily going to be pretty...
      Chassis
      The front bulkhead also reduces in height down to 525mm – meaning the driver's feet will be slightly lower than they are today – but the area around the cockpit retains a height of 625mm.
      Impact protection
      The crash tubes inside the chassis are changing for 2014, They'll be longer and of triangular section. Because they're a standard design for all the teams it slightly curtail a designer's freedom in the floor and sidepod areas. The intention of the change was to improve lateral impact protection while also reducing costs. The design work for the standardised tubes was done here at Infiniti Red Bull Racing.
      Engine
      All the changes this year are big but this, without question is the big one. The 2.4l V8 engine F1 has used since 2006 has been retired and is replaced with a 1.6l V6 unit, featuring direct injection, a turbocharger and a limit of 15,000rpm, down from 18,000rpm in 2013.
      Energy Recovery
      Despite the smaller engine, 2014 isn't expected to see any shortfall in horsepower, thanks to an uprated KERS and the addition of a second energy recovery system. The KERS motor-generator (aka MGU-K) can supply 120kW rather than the 60kW of the old system. More significantly the MGU-K can release up to 4MJ per lap – that's ten times as much as was allowable in 2013 and means KERS will be either recovering or releasing energy for most of the lap.
      While the MGU-K can release 4MJ per lap it can only recover 2MJ. Any other energy recovered will come from the second energy recovery system. The MGU-H (K for Kinetic, H for Heat) is part of the turbocharger assembly and recovers heat energy from the flow of exhaust gases. It will serve several functions: preventing the turbo from over-speeding (ie replicating the function of the waste gate on a conventional turbo), negating turbo-lag by keeping the turbocharger spun-up, and feeding excess energy into either battery storage or directly to the MGU-K.
      Taken together, the 2014 ERS will be allowed to provide ten times the energy of 2013 KERS, and will supply a motor delivering twice as much power.
      Battery pack
      More recovered energy means more energy storage – which means a bigger battery pack. It's now required that the batteries pack weigh between 20-25kg. It will also be necessary to place the battery in the centre of the car (under the fuel cell) as one coherent unit.
      Radiators
      The knock on effect of the new power unit is that the F1 car will require more cooling. Expect to see bulkier sidepods to accommodate larger radiators.
      Rear brakes
      For 2014 the rear brakes get a powered rear braking system with a degree of electronic control. This will help control the car and counter problems experienced previous with harvesting energy under braking.
      Exhaust
      Another big change. For 2014 F1 cars will feature exhaust exits 170-185mm behind the rear axle line. When the exhaust blown diffuser became an issue a few years, F1 regulators sought to stop the exploitation of exhaust gasses for aerodynamic gain. The first solution was to legislate exhausts that exited the bodywork pointing skywards. Teams countered this by sculpting their bodywork to take advantage of the Coanda effect, and recapture the fluid flow. This latest rule tweak moves the exhaust exit downstream of the bodywork attempting to halt its influence on aerodynamics (beyond that which is incidental to its function).
      Rear wing
      Given the placement of the exhausts, the lower beam wing wasn't going to survive in the 2014 regulations. Its original purpose was to add rigidity to the rear wing structure and to replace it teams will be able to use vertical stabilisers. The new regs will allow them to retain the monkey seat (or Y75 winglet for those with no sense of fun). Another change to the rear wing is that the main plane will be a little shallower.
      Gearbox
      Gearboxes will have eight forward gears instead of the seven we're accustomed to. As the gearbox ratios are going to be fixed from 2014 forwards (they may be changed once in 2014), the extra gear adds a little more scope.
      Weight
      Everything is heavier in 2014 – except the drivers. The minimum weight of the complete power unit is 145kg, (the 2013 engine had a minimum weight of 95kg) and the (unfuelled) minimum weight of the car + driver will rise to 690kg, up from 642kg. The increase is due to the inclusion of the heavier power unit but the figures don't quite balance out – so expect to see some of the taller drivers looking quite gaunt in Melbourne.
      Wonder if the weight changes contributed to Webber making the shift.
      Chris
      ------
      The new nugget
      I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself. - D.H.Lawrence

      Comment


        #63
        Kamui is back!!!

        http://www.f1fanatic.co.uk/2014/01/2...aterham-squad/

        Comment


          #64
          Yesssssssssssssssss
          Originally posted by brasher
          TJ is 99% African American.

          Comment


            #65
            Woohoo!

            Awesome to hear
            Sutherland Shires #1 Escort? is that like being the 4th best prostitute in Kazahkstan?

            Comment


              #66
              that's very cool.... bit of a shit car unfortunately but hopefully they go alright with him in it....

              Comment


                #67
                Wrong car but good to see him back in F1 :D

                :worship: RIP Sir Jack Brabham AO, OBE (1926-2014) 3 World Titles, Legend.

                Comment


                  #68
                  More news - KK is racing for FREE
                  Originally posted by brasher
                  TJ is 99% African American.

                  Comment


                    #69
                    In the article above he does say that money raised by his fans has gone into this comeback drive.
                    Richard's DatsunZ lappin LakesidZ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47OSh...&feature=g-upl

                    “Freedom of speech does not protect you from the consequences of saying stupid shit.”
                    ― Jim C. Hines

                    “Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.”
                    ― Daniel Patrick Moynihan

                    “Four hostile newspapers are more to be feared than a thousand bayonets..”
                    ― Napoleon Bonaparte

                    Comment


                      #70
                      Originally posted by Hypo View Post
                      McLaren are being sponsored by AON.
                      really? Max Chilton's family is the main owner of AON....
                      2019 Tiguan 162TSI HighLine R-Line ole ftang biscuit barrel
                      2011 Smart ForTwo

                      Comment


                        #71
                        Originally posted by TJ View Post
                        More news - KK is racing for FREE
                        See below. He's paying!
                        Originally posted by 260DET View Post
                        In the article above he does say that money raised by his fans has gone into this comeback drive.
                        Often wonder whether it wouldn't be better to just pocket the $6m instead of 19 F1 races.
                        "If you can make black marks on a straight from the time you turn out of a corner until the braking point of the next turn, then you have enough horsepower." - Mark Donahue Penske Porsche 917

                        "In Japan we no give fark for Subaru" - Trust Japan Technical Director
                        (TM - AVENGE)

                        "You can never have enough power. I remember when we had Group B cars... THEN we had enough power!"
                        Juha Kankkunen - Rally of Argentina '02

                        Comment


                          #72
                          FYI guys

                          NEW HAIRCUT ALERT TJ
                          Attached Files

                          Comment


                            #73
                            Control yo'self TJ
                            .
                            AutoMotif

                            VC Valiant

                            Comment


                              #74
                              Also, force India just tweeted this pic of their 14 car
                              Attached Files

                              Comment


                                #75
                                notbad.gif

                                Comment

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