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Heat cycling tyres in oven

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    #31
    Originally posted by StanM3 View Post
    If that was true, Iím pretty sure the tyre manufacturers would include this in their manufacturing process.
    But then they wouldn't sell as many tyres would they

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      #32
      It's high school science. After curing or vulcanisation (see Charles Goodyear 1839) in the manufacturing process, the tyre becomes one giant crosslinked molecule!
      It's pure snake oil to suggest this post manufacturing heat treatment links the molecules or alters the molecular structure in any way.

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        #33
        I wonder if this Oven heat cycling is basically post curing the rubber compounds? This is quite an established rubber industry practice for a lot of parts. Bringing the finished article up to a lower than curing temperature - say 125 degrees, and leaving it there for many hours is a lot gentler way of ensuring that any remaining curatives in the compounds are fully reacted, than rapid heating like what occurs on a car on a track. This should lead to much better aging of the compounds.
        I don't agree with any stress relaxation of the rubber as all the layers of the tyre are bonded together and once they're stuck they're stuck!

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          #34
          Someone needs to run three identical cars in next years 12hr or 6hr, with brand new identical tyres at the start of the race, one car green tyres, one car oven cured tyres, one car tirerack roller cured tyres, and see which set provides the best grip and for how long

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            #35
            I've just been talking with Fred, and he said at Thruxton because of the sustained high speed they couldn't run the car with green tyres, they would just blister. A set of tyres would be broken in at the start of the season and put aside for that meeting. All other circuits they would start the weekend with green tyres.

            So they would have been race slicks on a winged formula car. Take from that what you wish.
            " Racing cars don't have doors. Toilets have doors" : Keke Rosberg

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              #36
              Sounds like the process is more beneficial for high speed tracks with sustained load on the tyre.
              BMW M140i daily. Honda Odyssey family car.





              Wakefield 1.07.386 (FG Falcon - Street Tyres 1.08.8) Marulan Short FG Falcon 43.4 SMP GP FG Falcon 1.48.1 Winton FG Falcon 1.35.4

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