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New AC/DC TIG option - cheaper CIG FYI

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    #91
    Originally posted by Sprinkles View Post
    I've also got some 1.6mm gal sheet, will grind the gal off it and have a practice on it at your recommended settings.
    if you need more steel just get more, gal is no good and grinding it is no good.

    It is pure argon (not MIG gas) right? you will know if it is the wrong gas as it will spit like a mofo. I reckon TIG is much similar to oxy too, very civilized compared to ARC or MIG.

    watch weldingtipsandtricks on youtube if you haven't got on to him yet.

    this looks kinda interesting

    https://www.totaltools.com.au/weldin...welder-acdc200

    I bought some of their welding rods and they are great so obviously this thing will be great too looks like no provision for a pedal though. EDIT: had a look at one today and it has a "remote" socket on the machine so guess it would accept a pedal.

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      #92
      3mm mild steel:

      10-15 cfh argon
      1.6mm rod or whatever is handy, just adjust speed and feed to match. 1.6mm will be easiest, thick mig wire will mean working fast with the rod hand.
      1.6mm tungsten, thoriated/ceriated is fine
      20-30A, normally I'll set the pedal to max out at 40A for this size steel and run maybe half to three-quaarrrtars.
      the #7 cup is fine
      Tungsten stickout should never be more than 2/3s cup diameter unless using a gas lense or a fogbox
      Tungsten should be ground to a conical point, with the grind marks going the length of the rod, not around it in circles. Roughly a 60* cone point, and needle sharp.

      Put on some music while you weld, something with strict time is good. anything that gets your toe tappin' will do. Use it to practice keeping feeds'n'speeds steady and you'll be stackin' nickles in no time.

      To check for proper gas coverage:

      Grind a thick plate of mild steel down to bright clean metal. Set up the torch and tungsten for the max amps you're going to run, and the gas pre-and-post flow you want to run.
      Light up on the steel plate, no filler, and puddle up a 3mm or so puddle, no filler. shut down, and don't move the torch or plate or anything at all until you hear the gas flow shut off, just freeze-frame it til you hear the gas shut off. you should see zero discoloration on the tip of the tungsten and on the plate-it should be as bright and clean as it was when you started. If the tungsten is blued or purply, then you do not have enough gas flow, too short a post-flow time, or the tungsten is stuck out too far. If the plate is discolored, you need either more gas flow, or longer post-flow time to keep the weld covered until it's cooled.

      If you're really anal about gas coverage, do the above test with a bit of titanium plate, it will show you every little detail of gas flow and coverage. You can reuse the same plate as much as you want, as long as you polish it clean first.

      Comment


        #93
        Thanks again Xnke. The 1.6mm rods just arrived from the welding shop, so I'll try the settings in your post and will report back.

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          #94
          I reckon I'm doing something fundamentally wrong. Made all the adjustments suggested by Xnke, but the welds looked really cold, and lacked penetration. The only weld I managed on the 3mm MS flat bar that looks half decent, with worthwhile penetration, had the machine set on 90 amps (circled below):



          Here's the machine settings. I would have thought 90 amps on a butt joint on 3mm steel would blow a hole straight through the job. It's almost like there's another setting somewhere that's throttling the amperage. I'm just using the torch, have not tried the pedal yet.

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            #95
            yeah that doesn't look great, my TIGs looked better and I'm not very good at it (that almost looks like my ARC welding :P) it looks inconsistent too so might pay to just do more drills, that said you want it to feel right before you spend time getting it consistent.

            what is your base amps set at?

            are you moving the torch continuously or in steps?

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              #96
              No doubt about the need to do more drills, I've only had half an hour on this thing.

              Re base amps, I thought that was a pulse related setting? The machine won't let me adjust the base amp setting in regular DC mode.

              I'm trying to move the torch continuously, probably not very smoothly though. Need more practice for sure. Surprisingly I'm feeding the filler rod no problems with my left hand, thought this would be the hardest part.

              Comment


                #97
                Originally posted by Sprinkles View Post
                No doubt about the need to do more drills, I've only had half an hour on this thing.

                Re base amps, I thought that was a pulse related setting? The machine won't let me adjust the base amp setting in regular DC mode.

                I'm trying to move the torch continuously, probably not very smoothly though. Need more practice for sure. Surprisingly I'm feeding the filler rod no problems with my left hand, thought this would be the hardest part.
                fair enough, probably is an AC thing. the only TIG i've used was an ebay special which was DC only with no up or downslope.

                I found advancing a little at a time gave the best results, it let me concentrate on each step (make a pool, dab the rod in, retract the rod while keeping it in the argon, advance the torch by half a dime repeat) I found this video very helpful - his "arc too long" weld looks a lot like yours. Maybe doing a lap joint would be easier than drilling on flat plate too, has a good line to follow and it is good practice for doing lap joints.

                Comment


                  #98
                  Cheers Roadsailing, I'll try your method next, forming the puddle, dabbing, then moving the torch. It makes sense as a beginner method, when I'm trying to coordinate lots of things.

                  And I'm watching the video you linked now.

                  Comment


                    #99
                    Originally posted by Sprinkles View Post
                    Cheers Roadsailing, I'll try your method next, forming the puddle, dabbing, then moving the torch. It makes sense as a beginner method, when I'm trying to coordinate lots of things.

                    And I'm watching the video you linked now.
                    dunno if it is just a beginner method, it's kinda what he does in the vid. also I always rest my torch hand on the bench/whatever, I found that helped a lot. TIG gloves (or anything thinner than welders oven mittens) helps too.

                    Comment


                      Yeah, that's not the beginner method, that's the "all the time" method. The torch only advances with the puddle, the puddle doesn't get dragged by the torch. You have to slow up, wait for your puddle, then dip the rod, let it melt in, advance puddle, dip rod, advance puddle...so on and such.



                      The above weld is 1.6mm steel tube, done with no filler, at 10A. Even that felt a little hot.

                      Where's your ground clamp at? is it getting hot when you weld, or the connections on the torch and the front of the machine? You can loose a lot of power in a loose/dirty setscrew connector.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by Xnke View Post
                        Yeah, that's not the beginner method, that's the "all the time" method. The torch only advances with the puddle, the puddle doesn't get dragged by the torch. You have to slow up, wait for your puddle, then dip the rod, let it melt in, advance puddle, dip rod, advance puddle...so on and such.



                        The above weld is 1.6mm steel tube, done with no filler, at 10A. Even that felt a little hot.

                        Where's your ground clamp at? is it getting hot when you weld, or the connections on the torch and the front of the machine? You can loose a lot of power in a loose/dirty setscrew connector.
                        no image bro, imgur still works.

                        speaking of connections I need to fix the earth clamp on my cheapo inverter arc, only half of the cable is connected as it looks like that is all that would fit in the crimp. might splurge and buy a proper one to replace the pressed tin alligator clip.

                        Comment


                          Getting your self setup in a comfortable position, and that is comfortable through out the length of the run makes a big difference . I have both my elbows on the table so I'm as stable as possible (if sitting) or hands on table/ work piece if standing.
                          That's all I can really add as xnke and everyone have covered the rest.

                          Comment


                            New AC/DC TIG option - cheaper CIG FYI



                            I know the unitig torch at work has a dial on it which controls the amperage. Can turn it off on the settings if you donít like bumping it, I personally like using them as it lets me quickly adjust it without going to the machine

                            Comment


                              Guys, thanks so much for all your advice.

                              RS, I've got thin leather riggers gloves for the TIG. And I see what you and Xnke mean about the torch technique, the bloke in the video is so smooth it looks like a continuous movement at first glance.

                              Xnke, my ground clamp is on the table, it's not getting hot, I tried clamping it direct to the job, that made no difference. I will recheck the connections on the machine.

                              Euro, I've got a pretty good seating position, I'm using the edge of the table as a guide and rest for my hands.

                              BC, I'll hit up that MillerWelds site, thanks for the link. My torch has a dial too, but I tried it on 0, tried it on 10, and it makes no difference.

                              Comment


                                According to Miller that 90A should be right-I need to check the calibration of my welder's display I guess!

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