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    Tig brazing... Help a brother out.

    Hey guys.

    So I'm getting to the point of welding a mount tab onto the block for my 3sge.

    Tig brazing has been suggested and seems to be the go.

    I have collected some 2.4 silicone bronze rods. And have my tig.

    But I'm a at a loss as to where to go in terms of starting amps etc. And if there are any fancy tricks I need to be aware of before I get blazing ? lol

    Also how clean is clean ? Like a scrub and some degreaser or a grind back to shiny and fresh ?

    Cheers for any helps lads...

    Sent from my HTC_0P6B using Tapatalk
    RIP Carly - a smile to light the world.
    06/07/2011

    http://www.performanceforums.com/for...#post842594902 - making little toys for the big boys

    #2
    I've never tried TIG brazing, but I'd have to thing (like everything TIG), completely clean would be a good starting point.
    Imagination is more important than knowledge.

    Comment


      #3
      Yeah grind back all the paint, degrease the shit out of the area you're welding in. I've never done tig brazing however what I remember from tafe for welding cast was to basically heat up the area you wish to weld (if you have an oxy torch that makes it easy to do). Once it's hot, start your weld. Once welding is completed, you want to control the heat in the block so it doesn't cool quickly and just crack (if you have a big fuckin oven or patience with an oxy either way).

      If you've never done it before, it's probably is a better idea to pay somebody to do it. The way they made it out at tafe, it's something that takes a bit of practice & experience to get correct. Unless the mount tab isn't mission critical and you can afford to risk it.

      Comment


        #4
        If I don't braze the bolt onto the block, I'll just use some 10mm flat bar to pic up a different mount boss. The mount has 3 good solid mount points, the fourth is just insurance lol.

        The brazing shouldn't shock the cast any/much as it doesn't actually puddle the base metal. The block itself shouldn't ever get to a melting temp, just hot enough for the liguid bronze to glue.

        So much less chance of explosions etc (success not guaranteed lol)

        Sent from my HTC_0P6B using Tapatalk
        RIP Carly - a smile to light the world.
        06/07/2011

        http://www.performanceforums.com/for...#post842594902 - making little toys for the big boys

        Comment


          #5
          If you have 3 mounts in the block I don't think a forth brazed mount will do shit TBH...likely it'll just crack
          GT8
          1UZ Celica
          1.07 flat Wakefield Park

          Comment


            #6
            Cleanliness is always important.
            Use about 1/2 the current you would for tig welding similarly sized steel parts as you are not fusing the parent material when brazing.
            There's some vids on youtube with some info on tig brazing with silicon bronze rods..
            If you have ever silver soldered or brazed with an oxy, you'll be half way there..

            Comment


              #7
              you probably already subscribe to this guy's channel, but this might be worth a look

              Comment


                #8
                Have watched quite a lot of his stuff but havnt seen that one. Excellent find old mate :D appreciate it :D

                Sent from my HTC_0P6B using Tapatalk
                RIP Carly - a smile to light the world.
                06/07/2011

                http://www.performanceforums.com/for...#post842594902 - making little toys for the big boys

                Comment


                  #9
                  Brazing is underrated, repaired a broken gear tooth on my brothers old G60 patrol gearbox and it outlasted the gearbox being replaced with a 5 speed!
                  Originally posted by ALLMTR
                  the theory is the fuel pump is one of the only things that can fuck out on a diesel

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Yeah I have other options available to make this solution work, but I'm really keen to learn something new.

                    So I'm keen to have a crack at brazing this nut onto the block.

                    Also I'm going to have a go at tig brazing some of the bike frame stuff ...

                    Sent from my HTC_0P6B using Tapatalk
                    RIP Carly - a smile to light the world.
                    06/07/2011

                    http://www.performanceforums.com/for...#post842594902 - making little toys for the big boys

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Quick question (and I'm not sure if its relevant to TIG, my experience is with oxy). Are you intending / trying to do the traditional "brazing" where you get the bits to a dull red, apply the filler rod and it melts and is drawn into the joint (sort of like soldering), or what I've seen referred to as "bronze welding" - building up a fillet like a normal weld, but in this case the fillet is bronze (like the video above) ?

                      Not sure how it wiltranslates to TIG, but my tips based on oxy brazing are :

                      1. Cleanliness ! Everything must be spotless.

                      2. Heat. Don't overdo it or you will burn the alloying metals out of the filler rod (zinc, etc). Bubbling filler and / or whitish smoke (like you get when welding gal pipe) is a sure sign its too hot and you've stuffed it. I find that a dull red in the work being joined works best. I keep heating till I think its good, take the heat away and put the brazing rod on the joint. If its hot enough, the rod will melt and "wick" into the joint. If not, apply a little more heat and try again.

                      Apologies if none of this applies to TIG brazing. Keen to hear how you go !

                      Comment


                        #12
                        From what I can tell there is no reliance on whicking effect with tig brazing. It's essentially building the fillet...

                        The only experience I have is with lugged bicycle frames where by brazing they refer to the whicking effect of drawing the molten filler into the gap and gluing the lug and tube together. Also for mounts for cables and bottle cages etc etc. It's all whicking.

                        The fillet brazed bike all rely on a buildup that is then smoothed out. (not always).

                        Also silver is often used, especially with stainless tubing, in the place of bronze..

                        Sent from my HTC_0P6B using Tapatalk
                        RIP Carly - a smile to light the world.
                        06/07/2011

                        http://www.performanceforums.com/for...#post842594902 - making little toys for the big boys

                        Comment


                          #13
                          In that case, I have nothing to offer !

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Hahha nah you have offered heaps lol

                            This is all very imaginary right now. With my issues I am having trouble getting it all straight in my head. So just bouncing ideas and Shit around actually helps a lot when it comes to forcing me to clarify my own understandings.

                            I'm kinda relying on winging it and it all coming together as I work on it lol (not the best policy lol)

                            Sent from my HTC_0P6B using Tapatalk
                            RIP Carly - a smile to light the world.
                            06/07/2011

                            http://www.performanceforums.com/for...#post842594902 - making little toys for the big boys

                            Comment


                              #15
                              my 2c: brazing strength is dependant on the shear strength of the braze material drawn into tightly overlapping Joints. so excellent for slip Joints, overlaps, or other big surface area joins where the braze is in shear.

                              using a brazing rod as a tig filler, and running a braze bead is an entirely different mechanical situation. now the tensile strength of the braze material itself become the most important factor, you have limited surface area where the braze 'keys' into the surfaces, and the surfaces are oriented at 90deg to each other (so never in shear). gut Feeling says such a Joint would be a bit dicky, and certainly nowhere near as strong as a regular tig welded Joint. if could tig the Joint, i dont know why youd braze it.

                              cool old bike Frames were brazed, sure, but they used slip joints
                              Mit freundlichen Gre

                              Originally posted by Keith Duckworth
                              "I think that in a racing engine, the closer it is to disintegrating, in general the better its performance will be "

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