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Ebay plastic welders

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    #16
    Originally posted by gtrboyy View Post
    What are these like for thin small dash plastics or they mainly for bumper bars & bikes?
    I would use these welding 10mm thick sheets together with a filler rod. so imagine you would blow a hole or do very messy stressful work.
    would be similar to trying to solder electronic components to a printed circuit board with your grand dads kero roofing riveting torch in my eyes

    If a hair dryer were compared to a cigarette lighter or a little butane soldering iron, this is like propane torch turned down half way. if that helps at all haha?
    Originally posted by E-Z
    If TK told me to close my eyes and bend over, I would.

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      #17
      Yeah thought be bit too much for super thin broken dash plastics...might try sikaflex since superglue failed in some sections.

      These be 5mm or less even in corners.
      an easy fix is get a mate to drive in front of you at 60 then 80 then 100 and mark in on your speedo with some liquid paper.

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        #18
        Originally posted by gtrboyy View Post
        Yeah thought be bit too much for super thin broken dash plastics...might try sikaflex since superglue failed in some sections.

        These be 5mm or less even in corners.


        maybe try a little hand held butane soldering iron with one of the other attatchements?

        http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/HS-1115K-...sAAOSwzJ5Xf3Eq

        Edit, not that particular one, but that kind of thing
        Originally posted by E-Z
        If TK told me to close my eyes and bend over, I would.

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          #19
          Originally posted by Panda I give no fuck View Post
          yeap, there are 2 dials, element power and fan speed. basically crank up fan speed to top and turn off element and walk away for 10 mins. this is recommended and good practice with propper product
          similar to when you give a hammer drill too much of a hard time. run it flat out for a few mins with no load on it to pump the heat away
          Makes sense, cheers!
          '13 Yamaha R1 // '00 Toyota Supra RZ // '72 Ford XA Fairmont

          Sell me your old videogames? Nintendo, Sega, PlayStation, some XBox...

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            #20
            Originally posted by dsm2002 View Post
            No problems. Ordered one so we'll see. I have a 3D printer I have started to build but until I can get something out of it, I may take you up on your offer.
            Yeah cool, mines just a cheapy but happy to print some stuff
            #WHOTW award winner #blessed #susanalbumparty

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              #21
              Originally posted by gtrboyy View Post
              Yeah thought be bit too much for super thin broken dash plastics...might try sikaflex since superglue failed in some sections.

              These be 5mm or less even in corners.
              The one I posted above, use it on dash plastics just fine.

              https://www.jaycar.com.au/plastic-we...atech/p/TS1331

              gas powered (portable), like a soldering iron, so intuitive enough to use. You do have to sort out the base plastic type so you use the right filler rod, otherwise it will be shit.

              Sometimes if the part is cracked, but otherwise complete (the crack closes up tight) I don't bother with the filler rod, from the back just melt it all together again - which you oculd do with a regular soldering iron if you must.
              GT-P
              Bandsenkowagon

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                #22
                Rather than start a new thread, this can become the Plastic Welding Thread.

                I've been using my Dremel gas soldering iron with a "plastic welding knife" tip for odd repairs of plastic trim pieces. Pulling apart car interiors it's inevitable that something breaks, or more commonly I'm finding someone has been in there before and broken it already.

                Been looking at getting a proper thermostat-controlled heat gun with a fine nozzle to do cleaner jobs, but I'm on the fence about buying cheap tools. The contact heating with the soldering iron is a bit messy, although most of the time the welds don't need to be pretty if they aren't visible, hidden behind trim, etc.

                Most recently I repaired some 35 year old Lego pieces that were broken (my old stuff from when I was a kid, handed down to the young bloke).






                Lego is made of ABS, which has a very narrow temperature window of being suitably melted, just a little too hot and it burns. The aesthetics of this overheating/burning are even worse in white or light pigmented material.

                The key to making a good plastic weld is pressure, the melted parts need to be pressed together, or the melted welding rod pressed firmly into the two parts (that are also appropriately melted).

                Those Lego pieces were "butt welded" where both parts were simultaneously melted, then pressed together, beads of melted material pressed out of the joint looks ugly but it's a strong bond.
                Jaguar XJR, Freelander 2 HSE, Jaguar XKR, MINI Cooper S
                Originally posted by nutttr
                People must assume you are some sort of drug dealer with all these nice cars turning up to a fibro home

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                  #23
                  Ive got one of these jobbies... https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/YIHUA-85...-/301958208132


                  It's one of those things that I never realised how much use it would get until I owned one.
                  Super fucking handy.

                  I've done a bunch of plastic welding with it. And soldering, heatshinking, drying shit, etc, etc.

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