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Restoring a "cast" finish after welding/linishing

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    Restoring a "cast" finish after welding/linishing

    Welded up some spare vac ports on the intake manifold etc, and am now left with some fairly unsightly linished bits, kind of like this on the water outlet:


    Short of painting the manifold, or linishing/brushing the entire thing, is there any reasonable way to make it look relatively factory?
    Chris
    ------
    The new nugget
    I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself. - D.H.Lawrence

    #2
    I would continue to remove the rough castings and then polish it, looks like it's a pretty small part with easy access.

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      #3
      Originally posted by 080GMH View Post
      I would continue to remove the rough castings and then polish it, looks like it's a pretty small part with easy access.
      Nope, polishing is the last thing i want.
      Chris
      ------
      The new nugget
      I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself. - D.H.Lawrence

      Comment


        #4
        Sandblast it.

        Don't mention the adBlocker !!

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          #5
          TK posted something years ago about 'restoring' a port finish to not looked like it had been ported (some sort of acid I think). Unfortunately I can't get the search to work to find it.

          Alternately, sand paper and a hammer?
          Imagination is more important than knowledge.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Ben Wilson View Post
            TK posted something years ago about 'restoring' a port finish to not looked like it had been ported (some sort of acid I think). Unfortunately I can't get the search to work to find it.

            Alternately, sand paper and a hammer?
            I thought the same thing, something about using battery acid (or some type of acid) to make a port look factory seem familiar??

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Paul M View Post

              I thought the same thing, something about using battery acid (or some type of acid) to make a port look factory seem familiar??
              Yeah, i remember something too now that you mention it.

              A couple of other threads i have found mention muriatic acid as well.
              Chris
              ------
              The new nugget
              I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself. - D.H.Lawrence

              Comment


                #8
                Maybe a needle scaler? may be too aggressive though

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by gerry View Post
                  Maybe a needle scaler? may be too aggressive though
                  Too aggressive according to this thread:
                  https://www.classiczcars.com/forums/...luminum-parts/
                  Chris
                  ------
                  The new nugget
                  I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself. - D.H.Lawrence

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Maybe orbital sand the whole thing with the roughest grit sandpaper you can get hold of.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Sand blast.
                      "Where can we get hold of a Vincent Black Shadow?" "Whats that?" "A fantastic bike," I said. "The new model is something like two thousand cubic inches, developing two hundred brake-horsepower at four thousand revolutions per minute on a magnesium frame with two styrofoam seats and a total curb weight of exactly two hundred pounds."

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                        #12
                        I've done this. Sandblasting will make that look oem in no time.
                        Originally posted by Einstein
                        The definition of insanity is repeating the same action and expecting a different result

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                          #13
                          also done this with sand blasting alloy. looks sand cast and very acceptable. bear in mind, it gets dirt as fuck very quickly, so direct from the sandblaster (with gloves!) give it a quick hit with matt clearcoat
                          Mit freundlichen Gre

                          Originally posted by Keith Duckworth
                          "I think that in a racing engine, the closer it is to disintegrating, in general the better its performance will be "

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by carcrazy View Post
                            I've done this. Sandblasting will make that look oem in no time.
                            x3 Sandblasting, even in a small home cabinet setup gives it a dull non reflective surface.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by doctor ed View Post
                              also done this with sand blasting alloy. looks sand cast and very acceptable. bear in mind, it gets dirt as fuck very quickly, so direct from the sandblaster (with gloves!) give it a quick hit with matt clearcoat
                              I've found that hitting it with a stainless scouring pad knocks the sharp edges of a freshly blasted part and gets rid of the dirt magnet effect.
                              Imagination is more important than knowledge.

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