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    #46
    The rear arch wasn't much better, it had been lap welded on the bottom and had been fibre glassed on the outside.

    GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0159 by GAS FAB, on Flickr


    So another repair panel was made

    GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0160 by GAS FAB, on Flickr


    Out with the old

    GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0161 by GAS FAB, on Flickr


    In with the new

    GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0162 by GAS FAB, on Flickr

    GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0163 by GAS FAB, on Flickr

    GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0164 by GAS FAB, on Flickr
    Last edited by garvice; 14-03-21, 05:11 PM.
    Customer Cars
    GAS FAB XM Coupe - PerformanceForums
    GAS FAB Mk1 Escort - PerformanceForums
    GAS FAB - 1985 Porsche 911 3.2ltr Carrera Cabriolet - PerformanceForums

    GAS FAB Cars
    GAS 260Z RB26DET
    GAS 1600 3SGE BEAMS

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      #47
      Then was the rear of the quarter. The outer quarter had been badly lap welded previously.

      GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0165 by GAS FAB, on Flickr


      They had even left a section of the old panel inside instead of removing it. You can also see from these pictures what we were working with.

      GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0166 by GAS FAB, on Flickr

      GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0167 by GAS FAB, on Flickr

      GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0168 by GAS FAB, on Flickr

      GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0169 by GAS FAB, on Flickr


      So a new inner panel/boot floor drop was made. I bent a floor flange in it to keep the panel straight but then realised I had bent it the wrong way, doh. It was ok as I had already decided that I wanted to put the weld in on the the side rather than the top of this panel.

      GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0170 by GAS FAB, on Flickr


      Panel ready to weld in (I've left it a bit larger than required so that I can trim it when the outer quarter goes on).

      GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0171 by GAS FAB, on Flickr


      Mig welded the seam and spot welded to the wheel arch and rear support

      GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0172 by GAS FAB, on Flickr

      GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0173 by GAS FAB, on Flickr

      GAS_FAB_XM_Coupe_0174 by GAS FAB, on Flickr

      And now you're all back up to speed.
      Customer Cars
      GAS FAB XM Coupe - PerformanceForums
      GAS FAB Mk1 Escort - PerformanceForums
      GAS FAB - 1985 Porsche 911 3.2ltr Carrera Cabriolet - PerformanceForums

      GAS FAB Cars
      GAS 260Z RB26DET
      GAS 1600 3SGE BEAMS

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        #48
        Amazing!

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          #49
          Killer work. My xp coupe is pretty clean but I'd hate to see it stripped down and what ever nastiness is hiding behind 55 yr old paint
          Originally posted by 50RTD
          Dave, have you uploaded the data from the carby?
          Originally posted by Dogsballs;n7259704
          Bit harder to Wank to without Wendy, but got there in the end

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            #50
            Very nice

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              #51
              great update - like a hit to stop withdrawal symptoms

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                #52
                How do you form those panels with curves? Is it in some kind of press? Or are you whacking it over an anvil with a big hammer?
                Previously known as Lobster, Chuss's brother's anus, Chuss's brother, Lobsook, Lobstersock, Socks, Sockz, MissAmericaImportGirl, ClutchCLobster, Clock Lobster

                CJM 4 Life yo!

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                  #53
                  Solid work Bradley.
                  Classic Auto Fabrications:
                  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Class...88753937823811

                  http://www.lescollinsracing.com/

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                    #54
                    Cheers Gents.

                    lobster. I use a bunch of different things but basically you need to shrink and or stretch then metal to get curves in multiple directions.

                    I mostly shrink using a shrinking tool or occasionally by hand (pucks/hammers). I mainly stretch using stretching tool or hammers (sand bags/wood backing) and plannishing hammers. If I had room in the TARDIS for another machine I might use an English wheel to stretch/plannish. I turn flanges using a bead roller when putting flanges/shapes on non straight shapes.
                    Customer Cars
                    GAS FAB XM Coupe - PerformanceForums
                    GAS FAB Mk1 Escort - PerformanceForums
                    GAS FAB - 1985 Porsche 911 3.2ltr Carrera Cabriolet - PerformanceForums

                    GAS FAB Cars
                    GAS 260Z RB26DET
                    GAS 1600 3SGE BEAMS

                    Comment


                      #55
                      Originally posted by garvice View Post
                      Cheers Gents.
                      If I had room in the TARDIS for another machine I might use an English wheel to stretch/plannish.
                      We use ours so rarely, it's almost not worth having... The flipper gets more use.

                      Classic Auto Fabrications:
                      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Class...88753937823811

                      http://www.lescollinsracing.com/

                      Comment


                        #56
                        Thanks for the insight Lauchy, good to know.
                        Customer Cars
                        GAS FAB XM Coupe - PerformanceForums
                        GAS FAB Mk1 Escort - PerformanceForums
                        GAS FAB - 1985 Porsche 911 3.2ltr Carrera Cabriolet - PerformanceForums

                        GAS FAB Cars
                        GAS 260Z RB26DET
                        GAS 1600 3SGE BEAMS

                        Comment


                          #57
                          Originally posted by garvice View Post
                          Cheers Gents.

                          lobster. I use a bunch of different things but basically you need to shrink and or stretch then metal to get curves in multiple directions.

                          I mostly shrink using a shrinking tool or occasionally by hand (pucks/hammers). I mainly stretch using stretching tool or hammers (sand bags/wood backing) and plannishing hammers. If I had room in the TARDIS for another machine I might use an English wheel to stretch/plannish. I turn flanges using a bead roller when putting flanges/shapes on non straight shapes.
                          Cheers for that. I didn't even think or stretching. All I could think of was hitting it with a hammer.
                          good job
                          Previously known as Lobster, Chuss's brother's anus, Chuss's brother, Lobsook, Lobstersock, Socks, Sockz, MissAmericaImportGirl, ClutchCLobster, Clock Lobster

                          CJM 4 Life yo!

                          Comment


                            #58
                            in your opinion garvice why are these past repairs a bit dodgy? Are they the result of shitty home jobs, or was that the acceptable standard from shops back in the day?

                            Comment


                              #59
                              Likes dirt,

                              I can't answer the question on whether these were home or shop repairs but I honestly would not be surprised if they were shop repairs. You have to understand that these old cars were not always old cars. They used to be as cheap and cheerful as the daily drivers we now have, so spending multiple days fixing a panel that was damaged wouldn't of been economical.

                              As to your question on why "I" think they are dodgy I appreciate you asked for "my" opinion as not everyone agrees on the right way. You also have to understand that I'm not a coach builder and I don't do this everyday (I wrote this post on the bus to my other job), so people with more experience then I, will probably cringe at some of my work.

                              Some of the things I've found in this car and others I've worked on that I don't agree with.


                              Excessive bog or fibre fillers where metal used to be. I'm ok with filler being used to straighten small imperfections. My work isn't at a standard where I can metal finish every panel so that it can just be straight painted. I do aim for that finish and I try to get it as close as possible but I'm ok with some filler to sharpen lines. What I don't like is when filler is used to

                              - patch holes or cover over existing rust, i.e. they haven't cut out the old rust or tried to remake a patch panel. If metal was originally there then unless you're modifying it with a more structural material, then put metal back.

                              - used to re-create shapes rather than sharpen shapes. I prefer to take some time to get a shape in metal rather then relying on the filler to create the shape.

                              There are multiple reasons I don't like it but fundamentally it's heavier, I've seen it crack and rust through and I've seen panels continue to rust behind it.


                              Lap welded panels. This topic is discussed and argued in depth on the internet r.e. rust/people's grand daddies Buick that was repaired that way and still not rusting blah blah blah. So I'll try not to say too much and limit it to what I've seen that I don't like.

                              - lap welded panels where the original panel isn't neatly trimmed at the weld or where the original panel is just roughly hammered in and a new panel slapped on top and filler is used to cover it all. I don't like this as it just feels lazy to me and feels like there was no pride taken in the job. If you're going to lap weld a panel then at least take some effort in the connection. Having said that, if you are going to take some pride in the joint by trimming it right/stepping the panels neatly, then why not spend that time but welding the repair as it would be just as quick.

                              - lap welded panels and distortion. Most of the time I've found lap welded panels they are deep under a layer of excessive bog (see above why I don't like excessive bog). My opinion as to why they require a lot of bog is that they've distorted and can't be easily straightened. All Metal moves when you weld it. You can try and limit the distortion but I haven't been able to stop the distortion and achieve a solid fully penetrating weld. So pretty much all panel welds require some plannishing to get them straight again. (Some corners/shapes of panels have enough strength to avoid most of the distortion). If you have 2pieces of metal back to back then plannishing the weld becomes very hard to get straight as your two panels will have distorted differently (one edge welded one welded away from the edge) and your dealing with a thicker section of panel.

                              With this particular car, the previous repairs I've come across have been rough/rushed are continuing to rust away from the inside out and the only sections that look like someone had pride in their work was the excessive filler work that someone has managed to artistically sculpt and sand into a shape that made it once qualify as a "show car".
                              Last edited by garvice; 17-03-21, 07:07 AM.
                              Customer Cars
                              GAS FAB XM Coupe - PerformanceForums
                              GAS FAB Mk1 Escort - PerformanceForums
                              GAS FAB - 1985 Porsche 911 3.2ltr Carrera Cabriolet - PerformanceForums

                              GAS FAB Cars
                              GAS 260Z RB26DET
                              GAS 1600 3SGE BEAMS

                              Comment


                                #60
                                I had presumed a lot of people do the lap welds because it adds a bit of stiffness to the longer panels, and in turn that means less chance of oil-canning or resolves oil canning (instead of doing the heat and rapid cool process to tighten the panel).
                                ---
                                Shed Project: 1994 Laser Lynx with BP-T

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