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    Oil sample analysis

    Oil sample analysis. Who's done it? Where was it done? Also can they test coolant say for oil or signs of combustion entering the system.

    #2
    Don't know about oil testing but there is a kit you can test your coolant with to see presence of exhaust gas.

    Have a look through the spark plug holes - if some pistons are very clean and others very dirty, you may have a coolant leak in the clean ones.

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      #3
      http://www.e-monitor.com.au/

      Oo___oO

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        #4
        I have it done for all the engines I build for customers until the analysis settles down and I get consistent numbers for three changes in a row, for street engines. Race engines get checked after every meet or every few meets, depending on the teams-but I will not warrenty repair any engine I built unless the customer follows the oil check schedule. I use a local tribo company here in town, it's not too bad cost-wise.

        Basically for the company I use, they want 50ml of oil, the exact brand, spec, and batch number of the oil, and some kind of identifier for each test, mileage or hours or whatever. They want you to try to grab it from the middle of the drain period, meaning they would prefer you not drain out the first 50ml from the pan, they want something in the middle for best results. I have no control over what the customers bring back other than I give them 5 sample tubes and the check schedule, if they don't follow the sample schedule, no warranty...

        When I read the reports, I look for the base stock analysis first-are they using the correct oil? Or are they using the cheapest swill they can get? Then, I look for things like aluminum, indium, tin, copper, and lead-these are going to be present from bearing wear. Aluminium also comes from pistons or improperly fitted valve spring pockets, pushrods rubbing, etc. Irons and steels, those are going to be off of valvetrain components or timing components usually, sometimes oil pump gears.

        What you want to see is the "bathtub" curve when you plot your wear metals vs oil sample number, so for the break-in sample, you'd expect lots of wear metals, the 1000 mile change, you would expect lots...then by the 6000 mile mark you want to see the levels drop to a low number, and at 9000 miles you want your numbers to be pretty dang close to the 6000 mile numbers, 12000 miles you want to see little to no change from 6 and 9000 miles, etc. In a racing engine, as long as those wear numbers stay low (regardless of passes/hours on the engine) and the engine is making good power, I do not open it up. But when you see those numbers start to rise, or if you see a sudden spike in them, you know it's time to pull it down. Since I started doing this on the race engines last year, I did not have a single preventable failure-we could see material failures before they got bad enough to cause a problem.

        I do think if I had to mail out samples instead of using the local lab, it would not be as much benefit to the racers-they wouldn't get the info back in time to stop a problem.

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          #5
          Haven't bothered for a car but get samples tested for work through Fuchs as we use their oil. I just call the rep and he picks them up. Stauff and various others do mail order kits which come with an express post bag. Pretty sure they are about $50 a hit.

          As Xnke said, take a mid-stream sample.

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            #6
            We do thousands a year at work, for engines your really looking for lead, iron, aluminum and fuel levels but you really need to do a few to work out what's normal although with the ones we do, they know what's alright and what's not. If it's abnormal for the engine type they let you know.

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              #7
              Originally posted by burn is weird View Post
              Any local alternatives? These guys don't respond

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                #8
                If nobody else, your Caterpillar dealer.
                " Racing cars don't have doors. Toilets have doors" : Keke Rosberg

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                  #9
                  Id like to do this on my race car. So whats the go, you need a few samples in succession to draw an accurate conclusion?

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                    #10
                    Yes it's a trending tool, so the more data the better. Being a cup car there is likely already some (or alot) of data that will tell you which bearings/components are made of which metal. So if you see a spike in the data, you have a rough idea of where to look.

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                      #11
                      Also worth getting unused oil tested if sticking with the one oil brand type etc. So you can compare results as one oil could have lots of zinc in it, and you see high zinc on the used oil report. When in reality it's fuck all increase and nothing to be concerned about
                      you cant spell advertisements without semen between the tits

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                        #12
                        ^^^ surely any decent lab would have already benchmarked for particular brand types though?

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                          #13
                          I have done it on the last three new (second hand) cars I have bought (Pajero, Outback, X-Trail) over the first 4 oil changes (usually every 5,000 km) to make sure there is nothing bad going on within the engine.

                          Mate of mine is a diesel mechanic and does heaps of them for the fleets he looks after - so mine just get sent off with them and he gets a report back

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                            #14
                            Who did you use Southo?

                            I think e-monitor's has issues with email services. I just got a bounce-back from gmail ( to:info@e-monitor.com.au). So their online form might be problematic too. I'll call up next week.

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                              #15
                              The ones he does is through Gulf Western.

                              Here is the first one we did on the Pajero
                              I am trying to find the subsequent ones so you can see the comparisons and graphs etc

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