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CAR HOISTS - 11 different types - Brisbane and Melbourne Warehouse.

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  • garvice
    replied
    Don't forget most rubber blocks for hoist sills are a good 100mm long. That's a f load more surface area than the little 30/40mm scissor Jack head. Don't over think it.

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  • GSRman
    replied
    so the answer to the question - more complicated than expected if I'm honest.

    Falcon - definitely bottom of the seam is loaded against the bottom of the slot in the jack - starting to lift the car you could still put your fingers over the top of the jack flats.

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    Camry... Inside of the jack flat rests on a flat section that is taking all the force - the seam is thin and doesn't contact the bottom of the groove on the jack at all - nor does the outside... if you put upward pressure on the outside you are gonna have a bad day - that said, when the camry has been on the hoist i put the pad under that square section with the suspension arm mount on the left side of the photo.

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  • Captiva Fan
    replied
    Yeah, the base of the seam on either side of it, and I've never thought about 'til GSRman said it but the seam is probably being used to ensure correct location.

    I was going to say I've seen jacks that have sexual relations with a hole in the underside of the car, but they've all been windy-handle ones not scissor ones.

    There were some 20mm-deep-slot rubber pucks on eBay the other day when I checked.

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  • Norbie
    replied
    Every OEM scissor jack I've seen has been setup to put the weight on the sill, not the seam. But that's only Toyota stuff, maybe other manufacturers do it differently?

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  • GSRman
    replied
    So I thought you would actually want the force on the base of the seam? isn't that what it's there for? and where factory jacks lift? eg they have a slot only to locate the jack on the seam?

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  • BeverlyHillsCop
    replied
    I've always just used a hockey puck with a groove cut into it for the pinch weld seam...

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  • Norbie
    replied
    Yeah the rubber hockey puck things work OK so I'll continue using them if that's all I can do, but I'd be genuinely surprised if there's nothing else out there.

    Speaking of which, I tried using my hockey pucks on the nopics Kia the other day and they wouldn't work, the pucks have a ~15mm deep groove in them but the Kia needs more like 20mm. Has anyone come across a larger size one I can use? I've looked at heaps of ebay listings and they all seem to be 15mm or less, if the dimensions are supplied at all.

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  • Captiva Fan
    replied
    I get Norbie's desirement though, not only is it neater without all these extra rubber blocks with slits in them sitting around, but you can lift lower cars … the Volvo doesn't sit super low at the jacking points, but when using the blocks to avoid squashing the seams there's not a lot of clearance when the hoist's on the floor. I had a squiz at a Cayman when it was parked in the hoist bay, I reckon it'd need to drive on the ramps to get the arms under it.

    Which reminds me, I need to get a set now I know what to look for, they seem really cheap on eBay and while I can use a solid chunk of rubber for the Volvo the Commodore's jacking-points really need the slit in the block to line up properly.

    The thought of using the jack in the boot now horrifies me, metal-on-paint, yeargh!!
    Last edited by Captiva Fan; 26-11-19, 06:57 AM.

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  • garvice
    replied
    I used rubber blocks (about 100x100x75mm with a20mm channel in them) on top of my hoist pads. Got them from an online hoist place but can't seem to find there details.

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  • GSRman
    replied
    we have just been using the rubber pads - on the jacking point seams - but still just he rubber pads.

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  • Norbie
    replied
    Yes that's what I had in mind, if such a thing exists. I'm thinking it must because lifting from a pinch welded sill would be a pretty common thing?

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  • Captiva Fan
    replied
    Are you after something that mounts to the hoist arm & replaced the existing flat rubber pad, rather than being a piece of rubber which sits on top of the existing flat rubber pad?

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  • Norbie
    replied
    Has anyone been able to find replacement lifting pads that can lift from pinch welded sills without crushing them? I've found rubber blocks on ebay that are designed for use with trolley jacks and they sort of work but I'd like to find something a bit more substantial. Does anyone know where to look for this sort of thing? I had a look on the HAPP web site but couldn't see anything there.

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  • neil_se
    replied
    Sorry to hear Lincoln.

    I managed to get it all installed solo with the use of an engine crane and tall platform ladder. It was pretty straightforward and your instructions on a previous page to get the balance cables adjusted was very helpful.
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  • LINCOLN
    replied
    Give us a call when installing. Happy to help. 0418900481. There are a few tips and tricks that the manual (heavy reading) does not describe well.

    P.s. I am no longer involved with the hoists due to health issues but more than happy to help.

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