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Rear Anti Squat Rate effect on Spring Rates.

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    Rear Anti Squat Rate effect on Spring Rates.

    Theoretical at present but seeing more anti squat in effect stiffens the suspension I was wondering if this should be taken into account when selecting spring rates. EG more anti squat can be negated by less spring rate. Is there any difference in the effect of anti squat to the effect of a spring's rate?

    I guess one difference is that springs hold the car up but where that goes I do not know..

    #2
    C'mon., where are the suspension experts?

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      #3
      I never worried about the affect of anti squat when selecting spring rates for any of my cars.

      I just worried about getting the rates matched to what I was doing with the car, the types of tracks and the tyres being used to make the wheel sit on the road as best as I could.

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        #4
        The thing that got my attention is the significantly different anti squat rates between the S13 and 14's. Research shows that more ant squat gives better straight line traction while less improves corner grip, particularly if bumpy. So now I'm trying to translate those effects into spring rate choice. As mine has a fair bit of anti light springs for circuit use seem to be the way to go. But I've been wrong before.

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          #5
          My understanding is that anti squat is undesirable and softly sprung is better. Of course I'm dealing with nice long suspension arms so camber change is negligible.

          BP18T on here has a demon tweak for S chassis rear ends to get them to really hook up.
          " Racing cars don't have doors. Toilets have doors" : Keke Rosberg

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            #6
            Given you usually tune spring rates primarily for roll response rather than pitch I wouldn't worry too much about that difference unless it is just a straight line car.

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              #7
              For track, you want very little anti-squat because it reduces corner exit grip. You can't really compensate for anti-squat with softer springs to correct the corner exit issue, because that will hurt your handling balance on entry and mid corner. So you need to address the S13 issues of anti squat geometry and bump steer separately from spring rate choice for handling balance. How you go about that depends on what class you run the car in and what their rules are.

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                #8
                Originally posted by Slides View Post
                Given you usually tune spring rates primarily for roll response rather than pitch I wouldn't worry too much about that difference unless it is just a straight line car.
                But this is the thing that has me confused, isn't anti squat going to influence roll?

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                  #9
                  It doesn't necessarily impact relationship between centre of mass and roll centre they can control them independently with pickup placement so it really depends on and difference in roll axis and mass axis between models if that is your concern.

                  likewise spring/shock mounting is controlled to provide rising/falling/fairly linear rate by mounying which may be changed between models.
                  Last edited by Slides; 11-02-20, 08:27 PM.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Neesan View Post

                    But this is the thing that has me confused, isn't anti squat going to influence roll?
                    anti-squat is the suspension geometry's reaction to forces that induce pitch, not roll. The equivalent in roll would be roll center height.
                    Last edited by hrd; 12-02-20, 08:32 AM.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by hrd View Post

                      anti-squat is the suspension geometry's reaction to forces that induce pitch, not roll. The equivalent in roll would be roll center height.
                      That's what I was wondering about. So anti squat acts independently of devices or forces that only control roll eg ARB's But anti squat acts in conjunction with devices or forces that control/ influence pitch eg springs.

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                        #12
                        Yes

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                          #13
                          Thanks blokes.

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